Upcoming Agent Spotlight Interviews & Guest Posts

  • Sarah Fink Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 9/12/2022
  • Jazmia Young Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 9/21/2022

Agent Spotlight & Agent Spotlight Updates

  • All Agent Spotlights & Interviews have been updated as of 7/15/2020, and many have been reviewed by the agents. Look for them to be fully updated in 2023.

SCBWI-Michigan Critique Carousel Opportunity

 

Logo by SCBWI-MI member Cathy Gendron

Happy Friday Everyone! I’m one of the 2022 Critique Carousel Coordinators with Alicia Curley and WendyBooydeGraaff for SCBWI-Michigan’s Critique Carousel. I’m so excited to help organize it and participate in it. It’s my first time submitting anything to an agent or editor in over 15 years.

FYI  The critique carousel will only be open to Michigan SCBWI members for the first week. In the event we have additional critique slots available, we may open to additional SCBWI regions/members. Keep your eye on our blog (https://scbwimithemitten.blogspot.com) and our site (https://michigan.scbwi.org)--Any information regarding the event will be posted there (and social channels).

Here are the FAQs we prepared to help SCBWI-Michigan members get ready to participate.

This year’s Critique Carousel is right around the corner, and we know Michigan SCBWI members have questions. Good news! We’ve got answers!

15 amazing kidlit agents are lined up for this year’s carousel and they’re looking forward to reading your work! We hope the FAQs below will help you prepare for the logistics of the event. More details regarding the participating agents will be shared once the registration website goes live in September. Don’t worry; you’ll have plenty of time to review the agents and pick the one best suited to critique your work. 

We hope you’ll consider taking a spin on this year’s Critique Carousel!

Respectfully,


Your 2022 Critique Carousel Coordinators, 

Alicia Curley, Wendy BooydeGraaff, and Natalie Aguirre 

Q: What is the Critique Carousel?


The Critique Carousel is a virtual SCBWI-MI event for members to receive a written critique from an acquiring agent. Participants will select a kidlit agent that represents their genre (science fiction, fantasy, etc.) or age category (picture books, middle grade, young adult). Agents will have a month to read submissions and provide the critique on our standard SCBWI Gold Form. After the event and after revising their work, participants will have the opportunity to submit to their critiquing agent for representation consideration even if their agent is closed to submissions to the general public.


Critiques cost $55/each and are a max of 6 pages. Please see more information regarding submission requirements below.


Q: What can I submit to the Critique Carousel?


Agents participating this year are open to critiquing: 



·                Picture books (fiction and nonfiction)

·                Chapter books

·                Middle grade (fiction and nonfiction)

·                YA (fiction and nonfiction)

·                Graphic novels (fiction and nonfiction)

·                Novels in verse 


During registration, you’ll be able to see which agents are open to critiquing what. 


Q: What is the Critique Carousel submission window? 


Registration opens at 7:00 pm September 19th, and it will close at 11:00 pm October 2nd. 


Participants must submit their manuscripts (and meet all submission guidelines) by midnight on October 2nd.


Agents have until November 12th to complete their critiques. We will do our best to have all completed critiques back to participants before the end of November.


Q: Can I sign up for more than one critique?


No; participants can only register for one critique during the registration window. In the event critique spots are still available, we will notify participants via email regarding opportunities to purchase additional critiques. 


Q: How do I format my manuscript for the Critique Carousel?


Submission guidelines for written critiques:

·                At the top of the manuscript or manuscript sample, include your name, email, and title of the manuscript. In successive pages, add your name and manuscript title to the top of each page as a header. These are not counted toward your word limit.

o        Picture Books:

§     Fiction: up to 800 words, 1-inch margins, double spaced (sample here). 

§     Non-fiction: 1,200 words, 1-inch margins, double spaced.

§     Art notes do not count toward word count.

o        Novels: 6 pages, 1-inch margins, double spaced. You may include a synopsis (at the end of your pages), but these will not be critiqued (sample here).

o        Graphic novels: 

§     Art and text: 6 sample page spreads in jpg or pdf format, as well as a summary/synopsis.

§     Text only: 6 pages of script.

§     You may include a synopsis (at the end of your pages), but these will not be critiqued (sample here).

o        Novels in Verse: 6 pages, 1-inch margins, single-spaced, no page breaks at the end of a poem. Run them right up after the one before. You may include a synopsis (at the end of your pages), but these will not be critiqued (sample here). 

·                Please use standard font formatting; Arial or Times New Roman, size 12.

·                If your manuscript is intended to be author/illustrated, you may add the line "author illustrated PB" (or MG or Chapter Book, etc.) in your contact information.

·                Please name your file in this format: YourName_AgentsName_GENRE 

o        For genre, please use: PB, CB, MG, YA, GN, NV

o        Example: JaneDoe_AgentX_PB

·                Preferred file formats: Word doc or PDF


If your manuscript arrives with formatting issues, we’ll let you know and give you a chance to resubmit, but you still need to make the submission window date. We are unable to offer refunds due to formatting errors so please follow carefully!


Q: Will there be more agents who represent picture book writers, not only author/illustrators?


We’ve worked hard to ensure there are plentiful critique opportunities this year for picture book writers. 13 agents are offering picture book critiques, however not every agent offering picture book critiques is open to picture book submissions (or picture book text only submissions). Please read the agent’s MSWL carefully when deciding which agent to select for your critique.


Q: Will the agents in the carousel be open to submissions? If agents are currently closed to submissions, will they accept submissions from the writers they critiqued?


Yes, agents will be open to submissions from Critique Carousel participants for six months after receipt of the completed critique. Agents who are presently closed to submissions to the general public are asked to adhere to this as well. Instructions for submitting to agents will be shared with participants via email, with their completed critique.


Q: I’m submitting a novel, should I include a synopsis?


While it is NOT mandatory, it is highly encouraged that you include a synopsis of your novel or graphic novel with your materials for critique. This way, agents have more information to analyze your submission. Please note, agents are not asked to provide critique on the synopsis itself, but they may use it for more context on your story, in order to provide better feedback on your work.


Note: Please limit your synopsis to one page, single spaced, standard formatting (12pt size font). Include this at the end of your 6 pages.


Q: How do I write a synopsis?


There are a lot of great resources online for synopsis writing. A few that may be helpful: 

·                How to Write a Novel Synopsis (Mary Kole)

·                Synopsis Writing Made Easy (Writers Helping Writers)

·                How to Write a Novel Synopsis (Jane Friedman)


Q: For novels and graphic novels, should I submit the first 6 pages? Or can I submit any 6 pages?


There’s no specific requirement here, however, we strongly suggest the first 6 pages. Your first pages are your first impression with an agent or editor, and they’re likely to be the only pages read in a submission package. Those are also the pages that set up the story, and the story may not make sense if you choose pages from the middle of your manuscript. You want those pages to shine! Making these pages as strong as possible can make a big difference in getting an agent or editor to request more work.


Q: I’m submitting a novel and my first chapter ends on page 7 and the limit is 6 pages. Can I just send 7 so you'll have a complete chapter?


No; please limit your manuscript to 6 pages. If your chapter is longer than 6 pages, look for a natural stopping point before that and send the pages up to that point.


Take a look at the manuscript sample for a novel. You may be able to fit in more than you realize by not leaving the typical spacing for a chapter beginning. 


Q: After I submitted my work, I made some changes and I want to replace my original submission with a new one. There is still time before the submission deadline, so can I do that?


No; please upload your manuscript ONLY ONCE. We cannot accept multiple revised uploads. Proof your work carefully and submit when you are absolutely ready.


Q: I would like a refund, or I’d like to cancel my participation. How do I do that?


There are no refunds or cancellations for this event. 


Q: I have a question that’s not addressed here. Who can I contact?


For any questions that are not already addressed in our FAQs, please reach out to critiquecarousel@gmail.com. We’ll respond as soon as we’re able. 

Upcoming Interviews and Guest Posts

Monday, August 22nd, I have a guest post by debut author Christyne Morrell with a giveaway of her MG science fiction Rex

Monday, September 1st, I'm participating in the Glam and Glitz Giveaway Hop 

Wednesday, September 7th, I have a guest post by debut author Keely Parrack and a giveaway of her YA thriller Don't Let in the Cold and my IWSG post

Monday, September 12th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Sarah Fink and a query critique giveaway 

Tuesday, September 16th, I'm participating in the Falling Into Leaves Giveaway Hop 

Monday, September 19th, I have a guest post by debut author Stacy Knockowitz and a giveaway of her MG historical MG historical The Prince of Steel Pier

Wednesday, September 21st, I have an agent spotlight interview with Jazmia Young and a query critique giveaway

Monday, September 26th, I'm reviewing Alba Dobb's MG historical The Other Side of the River and doing an ARC giveaway

Hope to see you on Monday!


 

Literary Agent Interview: Lynnette Novak Interview and Query Critique Giveaway

Today I’m thrilled to have agent Lynnette Novak here. She is a literary agent at The Seymour Agency.

Hi­ Lynnette! Thanks so much for joining us.

About Lynnette:

1. Tell us how you became an agent, how long you’ve been one, and what you’ve been doing as an agent.

I mentored in Pitch Wars for two years (2015 and 2016) as a freelance editor. It was amazing. I loved having contestants send entries to me and enjoyed going through my slush pile to choose a manuscript I wanted to help a writer improve. That first year gave me the itch to become an agent and my Pitch Wars time in 2016 confirmed it. I pushed that feeling aside, believing you had to become an intern at an agency right out of university. I didn’t do that, so I thought I’d missed the boat.

At times, I divided my day between my elementary teaching job, freelance editing, and writing. You read that right! I used to write, so I know what writers go through and can totally relate! I wrote romantic suspense novels and was starting to get somewhere, winning awards or coming close. I even had an offer of representation from an agent for one of my books. So exciting!!! However, a conversation I had with another agent while attending the RWA conference as a Golden Heart Finalist threw me for a loop!

I told her how much fun I had as a Pitch Wars mentor and I wished I could be an agent too. She laughed. She said with seventeen years freelance editing experience, I could jump right into agenting.

Wait. What…

I had some thinking to do. There was no way I’d start two new careers at the same time (as an author and agent). My hair would all fall out! So, I asked myself which career path I NEEDED to pursue. Agenting. No question. I get to read for a living. I get to experience so many worlds, characters, and plots—much more than if I had been writing my own stories. And I get to work with talented editors, agents, and authors aka My Peeps! I contacted a handful of literary agencies, received three offers, and chose to work with The Seymour Agency in 2017.

Best. Decision. Ever.

About the Agency:

2. Share a bit about your agency and what it offers to its authors.

The Seymour Agency strives to offer aspiring and established authors the representation and resources they need to succeed in the ever-evolving publishing industry.

 

Our literary agents firmly believe in exploring every opportunity for our authors. From foreign and audio rights to film, television, and other multimedia and digital prospects such as gaming and apps, we strive to provide hands-on emotional, professional, promotional, and editorial counsel to each one of our authors.

What She’s Looking For:

3. What age groups do you represent—picture books, MG, and/or YA? What genres do you represent and what are you looking for in submissions for these genres?

Currently looking for: (Always looking for own voices, diversity, and LGBTQ+!!!)

In adult fiction: thrillers, psychological suspense, contemporary romance, romantic comedy, and mysteries (traditional, amateur sleuth, and cozy).

In young adult fiction: thrillers, psychological suspense, horror, contemporary, mysteries, and fantasy.

In middle grade fiction: contemporary, horror, fantasy, action/adventure, mystery, humor, and novels in verse.

In children’s fiction: picture books (non-rhyming preferred).

In graphic novels: chapter books, early readers, MG, and YA.

4.  Is there anything you would be especially excited to seeing in the genres you are interested in?

This is constantly changing, but right now, I’m looking to add to my middle grade and young adult lists, including graphic novels in those age groups.

What She Isn’t Looking For:

At the moment, I’m not looking for science fiction in any age category.

5. What types of submissions are you not interested in?

I’m not interested in adult nonfiction or Christian fiction.

Agent Philosophy:

6. What is your philosophy as an agent both in terms of the authors you want to work with and the books you want to represent?

It’s very important to me to represent marginalized voices so I can help get those voices into the world.

Editorial Agent:

7. Are you an editorial agent? If so, what is your process like when you’re working with your authors before submitting to editors?

I’ll bet you never guessed I’m an editorial agent. Did my seventeen years as a freelance editor give it away? LOL Of course, it depends on the project, but generally speaking, we do at least one big picture/developmental edit. I read the MS and give the author notes on what is and isn’t working. I make suggestions on how to fix issues, but I don’t expect the author to necessarily use my suggestions—although, they’re more than welcome to. What I’m really saying is, “There’s a problem here. Please fix it.”

After the author sends the revised MS back, I then open Track Changes and make comments about all kinds of things like stilted dialogue; buried dialogue; repetition; passive writing; information/backstory dump; not enough emotion; show, don’t tell; talking heads, POV slip; not enough conflict; stakes aren’t clear; scene feels rushed; GMCs need to be fleshed out; pick up the pace; and the list goes on.

Query Methods and Submission Guidelines: (Always verify before submitting)

8. How should authors query you and what do you want to see with the query letter?

Please query me through Query Manager: https://QueryManager.com/QueryLynnetteNovak. Queries sent to my email address will be deleted, unread. I like a one-page query that includes a pitch and short bio. The first five pages should be attached. If you start with a prologue, you can mention it, but I’d rather see the first five pages of the actual story unless I’ve requested to see more. Note: If I “heart” your pitch in a Twitter pitch party, I want you to send it to my query email address not Query Manager. Yes, it’ll be read and I’ll reply to let you know if I’m interested.

9.  Do you have any specific dislikes in query letters or the first pages submitted to you?

If the query is more about the author than the story, I might not be able to get a strong feel for the premise and could reject for that reason. Sell me on your writing.

Response Time:

10. What’s your response time to queries and requests for more pages of a manuscript?

That varies. It depends on my schedule at the time. I TRY to stay on top of queries by responding between 1 day and 1 month.

Self-Published and Small Press Authors:

11.  Are you open to representing authors who have self-published or been published by smaller presses? What advice do you have for them if they want to try to find an agent to represent them?

I have hybrid authors who self-publish and are traditionally published (or seeking to be traditionally published), and I have clients whose first book was with a small press. I won’t represent a book that has already been published, even if it was self-published. Many publishers won’t touch them. I’d rather have a new story to shop. As far as advice goes, be transparent. You don’t want to start a professional relationship with your agent by “forgetting” to mention the book has already been published.

12. With all the changes in publishing—self-publishing, hybrid authors, more small publishers—do you see the role of agents changing at all? Why?

Publishing is constantly changing, so we adapt accordingly. As long as there are contracts to be negotiated, agents will still be around.

Clients:

13. Who are some of the authors you represent?

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Megan Hart/Mina Hardy

USA Today, Publishers Weekly, and Amazon Charts bestselling author M.M. Chouinard

Award-winning picture book author Joanna Rowland

Laura Brown

Stacey Agdern

Joel Shulkin, MD

Marzieh Abbas

Sahtinay Abaza

Alice Lin

Akure Phénix

Medeia Sharif

Interviews and Guest Posts:

14. Please share the links to any interviews, guest posts, and podcasts you think would be helpful to writers interested in querying you.

N/A

Links and Contact Info:

15. Please share how writers should contact you to submit a query and your links on the Web.

https://QueryManager.com/QueryLynnetteNovak

Additional Advice:

16. Is there any other advice you’d like to share with aspiring authors that we haven’t covered?

Having realistic expectations and a thick skin can make this industry a little more bearable.

Thanks for sharing all your advice, Lynnette.

­Lynnette is generously offering a query critique to one lucky winner. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower (via the follower gadget, email, or bloglovin’ on the right sidebar) and leave a comment through September 3rd. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter the contest. If you do not want to enter the contest, that's okay. Just let me know in the comments.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry. This is an international giveaway.

Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7@gmail.com

Note: These agent profiles and interviews presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found here is subject to change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old School Giveaway Hop

 


Happy Tuesday Everyone! Today I'm excited to participate in the Old School Giveaway Hop hosted by MamatheFox. I can't believe that this is the last giveaway hop of the summer. Summer has flown by for me. Has it gone fast for you?

Book of Your Choice or Amazon Gift Card

I am offering a book of your choice that is $20 or less on Amazon or The Book Depository. I’m looking forward to seeing what books everyone is looking forward to reading. If you don’t have a book you want, you can win a $10 Amazon Gift Card.

Giveaway Details

One lucky entrant selected by the entry form will receive a book of their choice for $20 or less at Amazon or The Book Depository or a $10 Amazon Gift Card. Open to entrants internationally as long The Book Depository ships to you for free, 13 years and older. Open for entry from 8/16 – 8/31/2022 at 11:59 pm EST. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. The selected winner will have 48 hours to respond to the notification email to claim this prize or a new winner will be selected.

Please note that you must be a blog follower and leave a blog comment to enter the contest. 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Upcoming Interviews and Guest Posts

Wednesday, August 17th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Lynnette Novak and a query critique giveaway

Monday, August 22nd, I have a guest post by debut author Christyne Morrell with a giveaway of her MG science fiction Rex

Monday, September 1st , I'm participating in the Glam and Glitz Giveaway Hop 

Wednesday, September 7th, I have a guest post by debut author Keely Parrack and a giveaway of her YA thriller Don't Let in the Cold and my IWSG post

Monday, September 12th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Sarah Fink and a query critique giveaway 

Tuesday, September 16th, I'm participating in the Falling Into Leaves Giveaway Hop  

Monday, September 19th, I have a guest post by debut author Stacy Knockowitz and a giveaway of her MG historical MG historical The Prince of Steel Pier

Wednesday, September 21st, I have an agent spotlight interview with Jazmia Young and a query critique giveaway

Monday, September 26th, I'm reviewing Alba Dobb's MG historical The Other Side of the River and doing an ARC giveaway

Hope to see you on Wednesday!

And here are all the other blogs participating in this blog hop:



MamatheFox and all participating blogs are not held responsible for sponsors who fail to fulfill their prize obligations.

How an Agent Decides to Represent an Author by Agent/Author Marlo Berliner and Refe Tuma and Frances and the Monster and Query Critique Giveaway

Happy Monday Everyone! Today I’m excited to have debut author Refe Tuma and his agent Marlo Berliner here to share a guest post on how an agent decides to offer representation to an author and to celebrate the release of Refe’s MG contemporary fantasy Frances and the Monster. I really love contemporary fantasy, and I’m excited to read this one.

Here’s a blurb from Goodreads:

What would you do if you accidentally brought a monster to life and set him loose on your town?

Adventurous and charming, this middle grade twist on Frankenstein features a precocious main character who does just that. Perfect for fans of Serafina and the Black Cloak and the Greenglass House series.

Frances Stenzel was just trying to prove her scientific worth to her parents so they would take her with them to their scientific symposiums for once--instead, she reawakened her great-grandfather's secret and most terrible invention.

Before it can destroy the town, she sets off after it, with her pet chimp and sarcastic robot tutor by her side. But monster-hunting isn't easy, and she'll have to face a persistent constable, angry locals, and an unexpected friendship ahead--all while the trail for the monster goes cold and time is running out before her science career, and the city itself, are doomed forever.

Full of thrills and heart alike, Frances and the Monster takes readers through winding streets and over perilous rooftops, with wily monsters, unpredictable twists, and powerful friendships waiting along the way.

How an Agent Decides to Offer to Represent an Author

 As I prepare for my debut Middle Grade novel Frances and the Monster to hit shelves this month, I’ve been thinking a lot about the journey it took to get here. I started working on Frances and the Monster after the publication of What the Dinosaurs Did Last Night, a picture book I wrote with my wife Susan Tuma. Our agents were supportive and provided helpful feedback on the initial pages, but when it came time to think about going out on submission, we agreed it would be best to find an agent that specializes in Middle Grade fiction.

So, despite having co-authored four books at this point in my career, I found myself setting out to query for the very first time. (Our What the Dinosaurs Did series began in a…less conventional way.) I scoured dozens of manuscript wish lists, pored over Publisher’s Marketplace, and started sending out queries in batches of six. Three rounds of queries, one major revision, and three offers of representation later, I had found a wonderful partner in Marlo Berliner, Associate Agent at the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency. 

Rather than detailing the process from my end, I thought it would be fun to get Marlo’s perspective on the process. I know why I chose her, but what goes into an agent’s decision to go with one author or manuscript over another?

Here’s our conversation:

RT: Hey Marlo! We’ve been working together for almost three years now (I had to double check my emails to verify this—I can’t believe it’s been that long!) so I thought it would be fun to reminisce about how our author-agent partnership began.

To kick things off, I want to go back to my initial query. When I queried you, we didn’t know each other from Adam. I remember I found you through your manuscript wishlist, which seemed like a remarkably good match for my manuscript. What was it about my query that caught your eye?

MB: I remember being immediately drawn into those first pages by Frances! Such an intelligent, plucky stem-girl character! The plot also grabbed right from the get-go as well. With each page I read, I found the story to be so imaginative and utterly unpredictable in the very best way. Needless to say, I was hooked!

RT: Once you had my full manuscript, how did you know Frances and the Monster was a project you wanted to take on? What were you looking for?

MB: I think the moment I knew I just had to represent Frances and the Monster, was when the reader is first introduced to H.O.B.B.E.S. (Household Operations, Bionic Butlery and Education Servant). With each successive page, I knew I had something unique and special on my hands. By the time I finished that first full read I decided Frances and the Monster had everything a middle-grade book should—memorable characters, a tight plot that moved with the pacing of a runaway train, an immersive setting, and an incredible adventure that felt original. Oh, and that ending just blew me away! (I’m not ashamed to say I even shed a few tears!)

RT: Signing the letter of representation was only the first step, of course. I remember spending a good deal of time discussing my manuscript, identifying what we could do to get it into fighting shape before submitting it to editors. What are the most important things a manuscript needs to have before you feel it’s ready to cross an editor’s desk?

MB: A manuscript needs to be as tight and polished as it can possibly be before I put it out on submission. First, I make sure all the big picture elements are in place—a clear, propulsive plot, even pacing, immersive setting and description, chapters that end on hooks, and characters that have agency and are three-dimensional. Once I’m satisfied with those macro elements, I go in for a deeper line edit to tighten the writing itself on a micro level. I want every manuscript to have that best chance of an editor saying yes.

RT: I feel fortunate we were able to connect with the talented and insightful Alice Jerman at HarperCollins on our first round of submissions, but I know you put a lot of work into those submission behind the scenes. I imagine it being somewhat similar to the querying process for authors. I don’t want you to give away your secret sauce, but what can you say about finding the write right editor for Frances and the Monster?

MB: It is a bit similar to querying, in that I’m trying to find that perfect match based upon editors’ wish lists and interests. I first select what imprints I believe the project is perfect for, and then dive further into exactly which editor I feel would appreciate the project the most. Sometimes it can get tough when it comes down to two or three editors that have similar tastes; in that case I just have to go with my gut. Occasionally just one word or mention an editor has made in a conversation can make all the difference. I also consider what they’ve bought lately and how that might impact the project I’m sending out.

RT: And, finally, what advice do you have for authors who are just beginning the querying process?

MB: Have several different types of readers go over your work, especially folks who will look at it with a very critical eye and not just tell you what you want to hear. Put your book through its paces before trying to get an agent. You might feel anxious to land representation, but if you send your work out before it’s ready, you’ll be making a big mistake. Also, as the querying process is going along, it can be easy to feel discouraged. Keep learning, keep writing, keep querying; never give up! It may take more than one manuscript and trip through the query trenches before fortune smiles upon you. But if you want it badly enough and you develop your talent, you’ll land an agent. And hopefully after those stars align, a book deal!

RT: Thanks Marlo! It’s been a wild ride watching my manuscript evolve from my initial drafts to the final story and your support and expertise have been a big part of that journey. Publishing isn’t for the faint of heart, but the right partners can make all the difference.

Thanks for sharing all your advice, Refe and Marlo!

You can find them at:

Refe:  refetuma.com

Marlo: marloberliner.com

Giveaway Details

Refe has generously offered a hardback of Frances and the Monster and Marlo has offered a query critique for a giveaway. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower of my blog (via the follower gadget, email, or bloglovin’ on the right sidebar) and leave a comment by August 27th. If you do not want to be included in the critique giveaway, please let me know in the comments. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter the contest. Please be sure I have your email address.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog and/or follow me on Twitter, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry for each. You must be 13 years old or older to enter. The book and query critique giveaways are International.

Marvelous Middle Grade Monday is hosted by Greg Pattridge. You can find the participating blogs on his blog. 

Upcoming Interviews and Guest Posts

Tomorrow, August 16th , I’m participating in the Old School Giveaway Hop

Wednesday, August 17th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Lynnette Novak and a query critique giveaway

Monday, August 22nd, I have a guest post by debut author Christyne Morrell with a giveaway of her MG science fiction Rex

Monday, September 1st, I'm participating in the Glam and Glitz Giveaway Hop 

Wednesday, September 7th, I have a guest post by debut author Keely Parrack and a giveaway of her YA thriller Don't Let in the Cold and my IWSG post

Monday, September 12th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Sarah Fink and a query critique giveaway 

Tuesday, September 16th, I'm participating in the Falling Into Leaves Giveaway Hop 

Monday, September 19th, I have a guest post by debut author Stacy Knockowitz and a giveaway of her MG historical MG historical The Prince of Steel Pier

Wednesday, September 21st, I have an agent spotlight interview with Jazmia Young and a query critique giveaway

Monday, September 26th, I'm reviewing Alba Dobb's MG historical The Other Side of the River and doing an ARC giveaway

Hope to see you tomorrow!