Upcoming Agent Spotlight Interviews & Guest Posts

  • Sarah Stephens Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveawawy on 10/10/2022
  • Eve Adler Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 10/17/2022
  • Adria Goetz Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 11/14/2022
  • Kelly Dyksterhouse Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 12/12/2022
  • Savannah Brooks Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 12/19/2022

Agent Spotlight & Agent Spotlight Updates

  • All Agent Spotlights & Interviews have been updated as of 7/15/2020, and many have been reviewed by the agents. Look for them to be fully updated in 2023.

Including Humor in Your Writing by Agent/Author Natalie Lakosil and Tracy Badua & Freddie vs. The Family Curse and Query Critique Giveaway

Happy Monday Everyone! Today I’m excited to have debut author Tracy Badua and her agent Natalie Lakosil here to share about Tracy’s middle grade contemporary Freddie vs. The Family Curse. It sounds like a funny, adventure story that has a perfect balance of humor, adventure, and a middle grader dealing with common issues in middle grade. I’m excited to read it.

Here’s a blurb from Goodreads:

In this thrilling and hilarious middle grade adventure, a young Filipino-American boy must team up with his ancestor to break the curse that’s haunted their family for generations. . . or be trapped in an amulet forever.

Now here are Tracy and Natalie!

Tracy: I’m so excited to share more about my middle grade contemporary fantasy Freddie vs. The Family Curse, in which I try (and hopefully succeed) to be funny. This book centers on a Filipino American boy must team up with the ghost of his great granduncle to break the curse that’s haunted their family for generations. This quick description might not immediately ring bells as “hilarious!” for some folks, but readers have let me know that I managed to coax out a few chuckles from them here and there.

 Natalie: This book was funny from the first page, actually! Freddie has a very dry and begrudging acceptance way of thinking about the family curse that his voice really carries the humor. For example, this is just a few paragraphs in the very first draft I read:

April showers may bring May flowers, but they’re also going to bring me an F if I don’t figure out how to stick everything together.

I thump my forehead down on my desk. My eyebrow lands in a wet smudge of green paint. Typical.

As usual, the Ruiz family curse is making my life a nightmare. Like straight black hair and those little chicken-skin bumps on my upper arms, bad luck is in my genes.

I guess I should be thankful that at least my whole family tree board hasn’t spontaneously combusted. ßfirst laugh out loud moment for me 

Tracy: Trying to make a book funny is serious business! In Freddie, I tried to focus on humor that doesn’t come off cruel or too hurtful. For example, the other kids in Freddie’s class may giggle or roll their eyes when he stumbles yet again, thanks to his family’s bad luck curse, but there aren’t any moments of Freddie being physically hassled by other students or ridiculed for being different. They don’t ostracize him, but they might not pick him first when they’re splitting up into teams during PE.

 That last part may be inspired by my own lack of coordination and understanding of how some sports rules work. In my defense, it was too easy to rack up traveling calls during basketball when my junior high legs were much shorter than everyone else’s! I naturally had to take four scurrying steps to make up the normal easy stride of a taller person back then.

Natalie: I related so much to Freddie’s embarrassing incidents. I think the scene that got me the most was of Freddie having just finished this incredible breakdance routine, and in the very silent room, farts just as he finishes. And OMG, who hasn’t had one slip out like that just at the absolute worst time?! You can feel it because the things he goes through are things we’ve felt, too.

Tracy: Overall, it was important to me to frame Freddie’s many mishaps and others’ responses in a kinder way because sometimes, attempts at humor edge too far into simply being mean. Someone may make a harsh joke about another’s ethnic or economic background or, for the sake of laughs, may otherwise treat them in a way that makes the other kid feel like there’s something inherently wrong with them.

Here, there’s nothing wrong with Freddie as a person. There’s nothing wrong with his being Filipino American, bringing leftover garlic fried rice for lunch, or living in the crowded part of town. He just happens to be the unwilling victim of a generations-long family curse, and the clumsiness that brings –though incredibly embarrassing—doesn’t somehow make him less worthy of friendship and respect. So I tried to keep the humor focused on silly situations and cringeworthy actions rather than personal traits, and it’s my hope that this kind of lighthearted humor resonates with readers.

What kind of humor do you look for in new works, Natalie?

Natalie: Well, reading Freddie should give anyone a great idea of the kind of humor I look for! I have a 4-year-old and a 7-year-old at home, so fart jokes and butts are pretty popular and I giggle too (FYI don’t ever let your kids realize they can ask Alexa to play “fart music.” Yes. It exists.). I like really dry and sarcastic humor, I like silly, I like absurd. One thing I don’t like to read is self-deprecating humor or humor at the expense of others.

And as part of the celebration of humor and Freddie, I’m offering a query critique in the giveaway, so if you have something funny you’re not sure is hitting or you want some feedback on, enter!!

Giveaway Details

Tracy has generously offered a hardback of Freddie vs. The Family Curse and Natalie has offered a query critique for a giveaway. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower of my blog (via the follower gadget, email, or bloglovin’ on the right sidebar) and leave a comment by June 4th. If you do not want to be included in the critique giveaway, please let me know in the comments. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter the contest. Please be sure I have your email address.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog and/or follow me on Twitter, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry for each. You must be 13 years old or older to enter. The book the query critique giveaways are International.

Marvelous Middle Grade Monday is hosted by Greg Pattridge. You can find the participating blogs on his blog.

Upcoming Interviews and Giveaways

Wednesday, June 1st, I have any agent/author guest post with Mary Moore and Emi Watanabe Cohen with a giveaway of Emi’s MG contemporary fantasy The Lost Ryū and a query critique by Mary and my IWSG post

Wednesday, June 1st, I’m also participating in the Berry Good Giveaway Hop

Monday, June 6th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Chelsea Hensley and a query critique giveaway

Monday, June 13th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Kayla Cichella and a query critique giveaway

Thursday, June 16th, I’m participating in the Dad-o-mite Giveaway Hop

 Hope to see you on Wednesday, June 1st!

 

 

 

 

Mom's Rock Giveaway Hop

 


Happy Monday Everyone! I'm excited to participate in the Mom's Rock Giveaway Hop hosted by MamatheFox. I hope you have been enjoying spring. It's finally starting to really warm up in Michigan, and I was able to plant some vegetables. I only have a small veggie garden. I'm hoping to plant tomatoes, peppers, and flowers in about a week. 

I am offering a book of your choice that is $20 or less on Amazon or The Book Depository. I’m looking forward to seeing what books everyone is looking forward to reading. If you don’t have a book you want, you can win a $10 Amazon Gift Card.

 Giveaway Details

 One lucky entrant selected by the entry form will receive a book of their choice for $20 or less at Amazon or The Book Depository or a $10 Amazon Gift Card. Open to entrants internationally as long The Book Depository ships to you for free, 13 years and older. Open for entry from 5/16 – 5/31/2021 at 11:59 pm EST. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. The selected winner will have 48 hours to respond to the notification email to claim this prize or a new winner will be selected.

Please note that you must be a blog follower and leave a blog comment to enter the contest. 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Upcoming Interviews and Giveaways

Monday, May 23th I have an agent/author guest post by Natalie Lakosil and Tracie Badua with a giveaway of Tracie’s MG contemporary Freddie vs. The Family Curse and a query critique giveaway by Natalie

Wednesday, June 1st, I have any agent/author guest post with Mary Moore and Emi Watanabe Cohen with a giveaway of Emi’s MG contemporary fantasy The Lost Ryū and a query critique by Mary and my IWSG post

Wednesday, June 1st, I’m also participating in the Berry Good Giveaway Hop

Monday, June 6th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Chelsea Hensley and a query critique giveaway

Monday, June 13th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Kayla Cichella and a query critique giveaway

Wednesday, June 16th, I'm participating in the Dad-o-mite Giveaway Hop

 Hope to see you on Monday!

And here are all the blogs participating in this blog hop: 


MamatheFox and all participating blogs are not held responsible for sponsors who fail to fulfill their prize obligations.

Techniques to Keep Readers Turning the Page by Donna Galanti and Unicorn Island: Secret Beneath the Sand Giveaway

Happy Monday Everyone! I’m excited to have Donna Galanti here to share a guest post to celebrate the release of the second book in her Unicorn Island series, Unicorn Island: Secret Beneath the Sand. I read Unicorn Island: The Secret of Lost Luc, which I found to be a fast-paced fantasy, and I’m excited to read this new book in the series.

Here’s a blurb from Goodreads:

In Book 2 of the series, Sam and Tuck are on their way to becoming unicorn protectors when they discover new secrets about the island that threaten unicorns' existence! From Epic! Originals, Unicorn Island  is a middle-grade illustrated novel series about a young girl who discovers a mysterious island full of mythical beasts.

Sam can’t believe how much her life and luck have changed since she came to Foggy Harbor: First, she discovered that unicorns are real, and now she’s on her way to becoming an actual unicorn protector! With her new friend, Tuck, by her side during Uncle Mitch’s lessons, Sam finally feels like she’s home.

But as the long-buried dangers of Unicorn Island begin to surface and a mysterious scourge spreads throughout the herd, Sam learns the truth behind Aunt Sylvie’s disappearance and her own connection to the island. With determination, courage, and fierce loyalty to one another—and to their code as unicorn protectors—the kids set out to protect the island’s secrecy and the unicorns’ very existence.

Follower News

Before I get to Donna’s guest post, I have follower news to share. Judy Bradbury has a new chapter book release in her The Cayuga Island Kids series, The Case of the Messy Message and Missing Facts. Here’s a blurb: The Cayuga Island Kids work on perfecting a chocolate chip cookie recipe, search for missing glitter pens, manage a Little Free Library, and more. And here are a few links: www.judybradbury.com, www.Instagram.com/judy_bradbury www.twitter.com/JudyBwrites



Jemi Fraser is releasing Built of Secrets, the first book in the Small Town Heroes Romantic Suspense series. Here’s a blurb: She's got a secret. Actually, she's got several. But only one might get her killed. Here’s a buy link: https://books2read.com/u/3GrgjK 





Building Suspense for Any Genre: Techniques to Keep Readers Turning the Pages by Donna Galanti

I’ve learned so much about suspense since writing my first book. One thing I’ve learned in fiction, and movies, is that surprise can be over-rated.

Surprise is two-seconds of “Boo!” Suspense is ten-minutes of “Oh, No! Will she die or not?” We’ve all heard go for suspense when you can–and for a reason. It keeps the reader turning pages. This means the reader needs to know a few things (without giving it all away) so they can predict what will come – and feel smart about it. Readers love feeling smart. Don’t we all? 😊

I’ve discovered that if we meet the reader in the middle and let them feel smart, they will stick with us. 

But how can we, as writers, meet the reader in the middle to create suspense? Here are 7 ways:

1.     Tease them with only a few descriptive details

In Katherine Applegate’s sparsely written, The One and Only Ivan, we can easily envision Ivan the gorilla.  But if you go through the book there are very few descriptions about him. He introduces himself briefly with:

“I have a gorilla’s shy gaze, a gorilla’s sly smile. I wear a snowy saddle of fur, the uniform of a silverback. When the sun warms my back, I cast a gorilla’s majestic shadow.”

We’re teased then only with brief images and visions of Ivan’s captured life in an old mall under the eye of paying customers as we read along. The reader must fill in the rest with imagination.

By giving the reader flashes of the setting here and there we involve the reader, take them along for the ride, and … build suspense about Ivan’s future.

2.     Introduce questions early on

Not just one, but many. Drop them here and there. Don’t make it tidy. Make it mayhem with meaning. But make sure those drops do have meaning.

If a knife appears hanging on the wall in the beginning, the reader will question why it’s there and believe that the knife has importance down the road. (So, make sure you show its reason later.)

Make the reader ask: What happens next? For example, in Rangers Apprentice, The Ruins of Gorlan, by John Flanagan we witness young, orphaned Will desperate for an apprenticeship as a knight on his Choosing Day. Yet, as the day gets closer we wonder, will he or won’t he get it? Then he meets a curious and unsettling stranger. And we wonder, what influence will he have on Will? And just what are these skills he thinks Will has? He offers Will a different opportunity and we wonder, where exactly does this path lead? Will is intrigued and disappointed all at once, uncertain of his future. And we, the reader, are intrigued.

With each question raised, we now have more. Who is this stranger? Why is he interested in Will? How are they connected? What dangers lurk out there for young Will with this new path he is reluctant to take? Can he grow into the hero we hope for him to be?

3.     Provide readers with knowledge

New novelists can often be afraid of revealing their best stuff early on. Fear can make a writer hoard their best stuff for a surprise later. But the reader can get bored with waiting, and surprises are overestimated.

Hitchcock, the Master of Film suspense, used this to build his tension in his movies. He gave the audience information the characters knew and also didn’t know, such as the bomb located under their desk.

Tick tock. Tick tock.

Yikes! We’re given all the information we need to suspect death is looming. Now we wonder, will the character die? So, what makes this suspenseful? Because we spend ten minutes hoping beyond hope the character we love doesn’t die! This style can be used in the movies or on the page—whether it’s writing for children, teens, or adults.

4.     Look at the big picture

Movies can provide great visuals for how writers can create suspense. Multiple setups can lead to one big suspense payoff. It’s the knowing what’s about to happen, and then it happens.

In one well-known movie, The Godfather, Michael Corleone plans to kill two mob leaders he meets for dinner. We see the murder planning. The discussion of where to meet. The finding of the gun in the bathroom as a weapon. The wondering of whether Michael will or won’t do it. The knowing that his life will be forever changed if he does.

Creating suspense with a big picture buildup can also create surprise. Here is where surprise can work if everything that led up to the surprise is exposed in a new way.

The big moment at the end in The Sixth Sense isn’t just a surprise–it re-arranges everything we know about the events we’ve seen beforehand in a new way. Did you guess it coming or were you totally surprised?

5.     Set the mood

Provide a suspense setting that creates feelings of heightened anxiety. Give the reader the portent of doom. The setting of a scene can have a significant impact on its mood. Use sensory details to build on those feelings–a sudden wind, a stormy sky, a rising stench, a jarring noise. Use world building to create suspense.

Here’s a scene example of how I aimed for this in my newest book, Secret Beneath the Sand:

“Sam knelt in front of Barloc, looking into his violet eyes. I won’t let anything bad happen to you. I promise. She gripped the necklace that Verny had given to her. Made from a unicorn tail, it was a symbol of his trust.

Barloc closed his eyes. I’m just tired. I have been since I got back to the island.

Sam bent her head to his and laid a hand on his horn. It felt warm against her fingers. She frowned and held the back of her hand against his horn to make sure she wasn’t imagining things. It was definitely radiating heat.

“Uncle Mitch,” Sam said, her voice quavering, “I think something’s wrong with Barloc.”

Uncle Mitch quickly knelt down next to her. He checked the young unicorn’s eyes and breathing, then stroked his horn.

“His horn is warm,” Sam whispered. “What does it mean?”

Uncle Mitch shook his head and bit his lip as he continued his inspection. Barloc whinnied softly, looking into Sam’s eyes.

“I know you don’t want to think about this, but . . . it could be the sign of another disease,” Tuck said.

“No!” Sam shook her head and jumped up. As she did, the ground beneath her suddenly rocked. She fell to her knees as the earth buckled. Uncle Mitch grabbed both her and Tuck, pulling them in close as Verny screeched and took to the skies, circling overhead with frenzied dips.”

So … do you think something bad is coming?

6.     Go slow

I know, you’re saying whaaat? But, yes. Slow down real time to show the full 360 degrees of the scene. In real life action happens fast. But it’s our job as writers to not show real life. That would be boring and over with in a flash. Show all the angles of the scene to build suspense. Use all the senses. Add complications.

In Robert Beatty’s Willa of the Wood, he moves achingly slow to build suspense. In the beginning scene, we see Willa, a young night-spirit, creeping through the home of one of the feared day-folk.

We follow her every step through the house as a thief intent to steal, hear her every thought, witness her every action until things explode. Not much is happening up to the exploding point. But so much is happening. And this all leads to a new uncertain path for Willa.

Beatty’s first line incorporates rich, spooky language that directs us to Willa finding her new destiny:

“Willa crept through the darkened forest, following the faint scent of chimney smoke on the midnight air.”

7.     And don’t forget to create characters to care about.

This doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be flawless. Giving them flaws makes them more appealingly human, but you won’t create suspense if nobody gives a hoot about your characters.

Suspense is emotional. It’s about revealing some, but not all.

And if the reader cares they’ll go out on that limb and meet you in the middle of your story. Build it halfway to create suspense, and they will come.

What techniques have you used to build suspense in your writing? What memorable examples have you read in a book or seen in a movie that represented great suspense building to you?

About Donna:
Donna Galanti is the author of the middle grade adventure Joshua and The Lightning Road, which the Midwest Book Review called, “a heart-pounding thrill ride full of unexpected twists and turns from start to finish”. She’s also the author of the follow up, Joshua and the Arrow Realm, and writes the popular Unicorn Island series that School Library Journal says, “fans of unicorns and magic in the real world will enjoy.” Donna is a member of From the Mixed-Up Files of Middle-Grade Authors blog, regularly presents as a guest author at schools, and teaches writers through her online Udemy courses. Donna has lived in fun locations including England, her family-owned campground in New Hampshire, and in Hawaii where she served as a U.S. Navy photographer for Fleet Intelligence Pacific. She’s also the author of the bestselling paranormal suspense Element Trilogy for adults. When she’s not writing you can usually find her off in the woods. Find out more about Donna and her books at donnagalanti.com.

Connect with Donna:
Twitter  
TikTok
Instagram
Facebook
Goodreads 

Giveaway Details

Donna has generously offered a hardback of Unicorn Island: Secret Beneath the Sand for a giveaway. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower of my blog (via the follower gadget, email, or bloglovin’ on the right sidebar) and leave a comment by May 28th. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter the contest. Please be sure I have your email address.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog and/or follow me on Twitter, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry for each. You must be 13 years old or older to enter. This giveaway is U.S.

Marvelous Middle Grade Monday is hosted by Greg Pattridge. You can find the participating blogs on his blog.

Upcoming Interviews and Giveaways

Today I’m also participating in the Mom’s Rock Giveaway Hop

Monday, May 23th I have an agent/author guest post by Natalie Lakosil and Tracie Badua with a giveaway of Tracie’s MG contemporary Freddie vs. The Family Curse and a query critique giveaway by Natalie

Wednesday, June 1st, I have any agent/author guest post with Mary Moore and Emi Watanabe Cohen with a giveaway of Emi’s MG contemporary fantasy The Lost Ryū and a query critique by Mary and my IWSG post

Wednesday, June 1st, I’m also participating in the Berry Good Giveaway Hop

Monday, June 6th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Chelsea Hensley and a query critique giveaway

Monday, June 13th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Kayla Cichella and a query critique giveaway

Thursday, June 16th, I'm participating in the Dad-o-mite Giveaway Hop

Hope to see you on Monday!

 

 

 

Life’s a Beach Giveaway Hop

 


Happy Tuesday Everyone! Today I'm thrilled to be participating in the Life’s a Beach Giveaway Hop hosted by The Mommy Island and The Kids Did It. I hope you're enjoying spring and looking forward to summer. It was colder than normal in April, so I'm feeling like spring is just starting here. I'm looking forward to planting my small vegetable garden and flowers. I'm hoping to check out a few larger nursuries for fun. 

Of course, I have lots of books on my TBR list. And I'm super excited to write the last chapter of my manuscript this month. It'll be only the second one I've finished. It's going really good. 

Here are the newly released MG and YA books I'm offering in this giveaway hop. Many of them are #22Debut middle grade and young adult authors. I'm big on supporting them on my blog. You can also choose another book in the series by these authors. You can find descriptions of these books on Goodreads. Here are your choices:










If you haven't found a book you want, you can win a $10 Amazon Gift Card.

 


Giveaway Details

One lucky entrant selected by the entry form will receive a book of their choice listed above or a $10 Amazon Gift Card. Open to entrants internationally as long as Book Depository ships to you for free, 13 years and older. Open for entry from 5/10 – 5/24/2022 at 11:59 pm EST. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. The selected winner will have 48 hours to respond to the notification email to claim this prize or a new winner will be selected.

Please note that you must be a blog follower and leave a blog comment to enter the contest. 


Upcoming Interviews and Giveaways

Monday, May 16th I have a guest post by Donna Gallanti and a giveaway of her MG fantasy Unicorn Island: Secret Beneath the Sand and I’m participating in the Mom’s Rock Giveaway Hop

Monday, May 23th I have an agent/author guest post by Natalie Lakosil and Tracie Badua with a giveaway of Tracie’s MG contemporary Freddie vs. The Family Curse and a query critique giveaway by Natalie

Wednesday, June 1st, I have any agent/author guest post with Mary Moore and Emi Watanabe Cohen with a giveaway of Emi’s MG contemporary fantasy The Lost Ryū and a query critique by Mary and my IWSG post

Wednesday, June 1st, I’m also participating in the Berry Good Giveaway Hop

Monday, June 6th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Chelsea Hensley and a query critique giveaway

Monday, June 13th, I have an agent spotlight interview with Kayla Cichella and a query critique giveaway

Thursday, June 16th, I'm participating in the Dad-o-mite Giveaway Hop

Hope to see you on Monday!

 And here are all the other blogs participating in this blog hop:


 

 

 

 

 

Agent Interview: Jennifer Unter and Query Critique Giveaway

Today I’m thrilled to have agent Jennifer Unter here. She is the founder of and a literary agent at The Unter Agency.

Hi­ Jennifer! Thanks so much for joining us.

About Jennifer:

1. Tell us how you became an agent, how long you’ve been one, and what you’ve been doing as an agent.

Jennifer Lee Photography

After working in editorial at a publishing house, I thought that being the author’s advocate outside of a house was more appealing to me. I love the negotiation part of being an agent (I’m also a lawyer) and finding talent. I’ve been an agent for over 2 decades! As for what I’ve been doing, I mostly represent children’s titles, but I also work in the adult space.

About the Agency:

2. Share a bit about your agency and what it offers to its authors.

We are a small boutique, full-service agency that handles all aspects of the publishing business from domestic to film to foreign rights. We want to handle an author’s writing career, not just a one-off project.

What She’s Looking For:

3. What age groups do you represent—picture books, MG, and/or YA? What genres do you represent and what are you looking for in submissions for these genres?

I represent all ages of children’s books: picture books, MG and YA. I don’t have any particular genres – I look for books that move me and ones for which I see a space in the market.

4.  Is there anything you would be especially excited to seeing in the genres you are interested in?

I would love to see a middle grade boy’s adventure series.

What She Isn’t Looking For:

5. What types of submissions are you not interested in?

I’m pretty full-up on picture books these days, but could be convinced by the right project.

Agent Philosophy:

6. What is your philosophy as an agent both in terms of the authors you want to work with and the books you want to represent?

I want to work with authors who do the work that it takes to be a success – both editorially and promotion-wise.

Editorial Agent:

7. Are you an editorial agent? If so, what is your process like when you’re working with your authors before submitting to editors?

I go through manuscripts as many times as needed to get it “right” before going out with it, so yes, I am an editorial agent.

Query Methods and Submission Guidelines: (Always verify before submitting)

8. How should authors query you and what do you want to see with the query letter? 

Email is fine and a knowledge of what kinds of books I do is helpful to see with the query.

9.  Do you have any specific dislikes in query letters or the first pages submitted to you?

Letters that say “dear sir” or are sent to multiple agents!

Response Time:

10. What’s your response time to queries and requests for more pages of a manuscript?

I try to get back to authors within a month if I have asked for pages.

Self-Published and Small Press Authors:

11.  Are you open to representing authors who have self-published or been published by smaller presses? What advice do you have for them if they want to try to find an agent to represent them?

I am if the books have been a success, sales-wise.

12. With all the changes in publishing—self-publishing, hybrid authors, more small publishers—do you see the role of agents changing at all? Why?

Agents have to adapt to the changes in publishing business just as publishers and authors do. However, even if the venue by which authors are getting published is changing, authors still need an advocate to steer them in the right direction, so I don’t see agents roles changing that much. 

Clients:

 13. Who are some of the authors you represent?

 See my website: www.theunteragency.com

 Interviews and Guest Posts:

 14. Please share the links to any interviews, guest posts, and podcasts you think would be helpful to writers interested in querying you.

 Also on my website!

7/11/2022: See her Agent/Author interview with Melissa Dassoril on agent/author teamwork 

 Links and Contact Info:

 15. Please share how writers should contact you to submit a query and your links on the Web.

 See website!

 Additional Advice:

 16. Is there any other advice you’d like to share with aspiring authors that we haven’t covered?

 Join writing groups and go to conferences – having that community will help in so many ways as you move forward in your writing career.

Thanks for sharing all your advice, Jennifer.

­Jennifer is generously offering a query critique to one lucky winner. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower (via the follower gadget, email, or bloglovin’ on the right sidebar) and leave a comment through May 21st. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter the contest. If you do not want to enter the contest, that's okay. Just let me know in the comments.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry. This is an international giveaway.

Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7@gmail.com

Note: These agent profiles and interviews presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found here is subject to change.