CURRENT GIVEAWAYS

Here are my current Giveaway Contests

The Mutant Mushroom Giveaway through November 28th



Tori Sharp Query Critique through December 8th

Reeni's Turn through December 8th

Upcoming Agent Spotlight Interviews and Guest Posts w/ Debut Authors & Query Critique Giveaways

Maria Vincente Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 12/7/20

Amy Brewer and Dana Swift Guest Post and Query Critique Giveaway on 1/18/21

Tricia Skinner Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 1/20/21

Pam Gruber Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 2/17/2021

Allyson Hellegers and Sam Taylor Guest Post and Query Critique Giveaway on 2/22/2021

Caryn Wiseman and Merriam Sarcia Saunders Guest Post and Query Critique Giveaway on 3/15/2021

Jennifer Herrington Agent Spotlight Interview and Query Critique Giveaway on 3/17/2021

Agent Spotlight Updates

All agent spotlights and interviews have been updated as of 7/15/2020, and many have been reviewed by the agents. Look for them to be fully updated again in 2023.

Interview with Agent Marietta Zacker

Marietta Zacker is a literary agent for the Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. You can view her Agent Spotlight profile here, which features further information about Ms. Zacker. Now, without further adieu - the interview!

The masses want to know, who is Agent Marietta Zacker?

Marietta ZackerThe intertwined worlds of writing and publishing have been a part of me as far back as I can remember as both my paternal grandfather and maternal grandmother wrote incessantly. Abuelo wrote because it was impossible for him not to, it was an innate characteristic. When his work was not being published, he took it upon himself to get his writing in front of readers one way or another. Abuela still writes – at the young age of 90 – because, she too, can’t imagine what life would be like without sharing her knowledge and her stories. As an adult, I found myself bringing literature and storytelling into my classrooms with every chance I got, regardless of the grade level or subject matter I was currently teaching. Introducing the world to the creative forces behind the words and art of some of my favorite children’s books became a passion. The publishing world was a natural next step. Now bringing together all the pieces of the puzzle as an agent feels like the perfect home for me.

How long have you had the (assumed) pleasure of being an agent, and how did you get your start?

Officially, I have been working as an agent for 8 months. My start…Craig Virden found me, then Nancy Gallt opened her doors wide for me. Before I met Craig and Nancy, I worked in publishing and with children’s books, authors and illustrators for over 15 years.

We know you love and specialize in children’s literature. That makes you welcome company ‘round this blog. What kick started your passion for kid lit?

The children I taught (and who taught me more in return), the writers and illustrators who surrounded me (and inspired me) and the professors who took me back in time to understand the how it all began kick started my passion. Many others have driven that passion to unimaginable places.

What range of projects do you represent? If we promise not to target what you’re looking for (everyone promise!), will you enlighten us on any particular interests you have? Keep it general, if you like.

I represent authors and illustrators and their writing and artwork are as varied as they come. I admit that I don’t know what I’ll like until I see it or read it – and sometimes, I surprise myself by some of the things that captivate me, so that is definitely a tough question for me. Having said that, as for particular interests, I hope to help usher in a set of voices and depictions that will allow children and young adults of all backgrounds, ethnicities and countries to see themselves within the pages of our books. It is imperative that the voices and illustrations represent the population of children and young adults who crave to find themselves in the books they read - authentic voices and illustrations that move us beyond the stereotypes and are as real as the world we live in.

What are you tired of seeing in the slush? Please, take advantage of this question. I’m sure you’re vamped- and zombied-out as much as the next literary agent (no offence paranormal writers!).

I admit that I am more tired of some of the things I see in queries and cover letters, than I am about any particular subject matter within manuscripts. It is difficult for me to ask to see a manuscript or get excited about what I am about to read when the query or cover letter has no soul or personality. I understand that everyone is trying to be respectful and professional and I certainly appreciate that, but if I had to choose, I would prefer to know who you are rather than the word count or to what book your manuscript can most be compared.

Would you describe yourself as an “editorial agent”? To what extent?

Yes. I love the process of writing as much as I love connecting the dots. I love talking through issues that are not quite ironed out in manuscripts, zeroing in on places where things need to be tweaked and helping writers put their best foot forward. However, it is also true that I neither want to be a member of the writer’s critique group nor take the place of an editor who will take the book in the direction that works best for them and their publishing house. These are fine lines to walk, to be sure and sometimes difficult to discern.

Preferences and pet peeves, we all have them. What are yours when it comes to submissions?

I’ll stick with the mundane here… unpaged manuscripts and single-spaced manuscripts. Then I’ll direct you to my answer above about what I’m tired of seeing in the slush.

How much contact do you have with your clients, and what is your preferred method of correspondence?

We are in touch often. E-mail is the most efficient. Phone conversations are a definite treat for me so I frequently pick up the phone and simply call. Face-to-face interactions (if at all possible) are the most fun.

I’m all about promoting agent research. What are the top two or three things, in your opinion, aspiring authors should research when considering an agent?

Try to find out who the person behind the agent is and whether or not your styles match. Remember that it is a relationship built on trust. An agent doesn’t necessarily need to become a friend, but given what you are entrusting an agent with, make sure you feel comfortable handing off your writing or your artwork.

Are you presently accepting unsolicited submissions? What are your submission requirements, and how can prospective clients get a hold of you?

Yes, I am accepting unsolicited manuscripts. Snail mail seems to best work for me.

(See the Nancy Gallt Literary website for submission information).

Now, a couple fun questions, if you’ll humor me.

Team Edward or Team Jacob? I’m just kidding. What have you read recently and loved?

Honestly, some amazing manuscripts (and I mean that sincerely). But I don’t think that’s your question. I recently reread THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS and fell in love with it again. As for something more current, I am going to keep that information to myself!

We’re out chatting it up and I buy you a drink. What do you choose?

A glass of lemonade or a dark beer, depending on my mood. Then again, it might be hard to say no to a really good glass of wine. And I’ll be happy to pay for my own.

Aspiring authors are always hungry for more. Any closing comments or advice you’d like to add?

Please sit at a library or bookstore, go to the genre which you are currently writing for, start with A and just read. When you are tired, leave, come back the next day or week and pick up where you left off. Keep doing that until you get to Z.

A huge thank you for your time Ms. Zacker. It's been so nice getting to know you better.

Stop By Monday & Some Updates

This coming Monday I have a special treat for you.  It might just happen to be an interview with one of our spotlighted agents, so you might want to stop by to check it out!

***

Now, here's a list of things that have been updated.

Links:  I've been using Google Reader for awhile now (highly recommended), so I decided to replace the blog rolls I had for simple link lists.  You will now find lists of Writerly Friends, Bloggy Agents, Bloggy Editors, and Resources.  If you're an agent, editor, or someone with a helpful blog and would like to be added, pop into the comments.  If you're a writer who has been commenting on my blog regularly or I comment on your blog regularly, same.  I know I'm missing people!  Also, if you're already on one of the lists or are wanting to be added, let me know if you'd like to be listed by your name or your blog name.

Sidebars:  I moved a few things around, deleted a couple extraneous things, and added more fabulous links to the resource list. 

About:  I finally linked the "About" tab to a post about me, rather than just my Blogger profile.  If you have any questions about me or a suggestion of something I should add, let me know here or there.

Agent Spotlight:  I've been working through the spotlights, updating information, deleting old conference dates, rearranging how they are laid out.  The main thing I've done, that might interest you, is I've added recent sales information on each agent from Publisher's Marketplace as available.

That's all for now.  Don't forget to come back Monday!

Friday Teen Files

I'll put up something next week, but today it's your turn!  Tell me a teen story, whether it be yours or someone else's - funny, heartwarming, sad, whatev.

If you have pictures (oh, how I'd love pictures) feel free to post on your blog and then let us know where to go!

Agent Spotlight: Kelly Sonnack

This week's Agent Spotlight features Kelly Sonnack of the Andrea Brown Literary Agency, Inc
Status: Open to submissions.
About: "Kelly Sonnack started her career in publishing as a Life Sciences editor at an academic publisher where she learned she loved working with authors, but that post-graduate textbooks and monographs were never going to be as near and dear to her heart as children's books. So, with a great leap of faith, she re-launched her career at the front desk of a local literary agency where she figured out that agenting was the perfect blend of creative and business for her. Nearly 15 years later, and a Senior Literary Agent at the Andrea Brown Literary Agency since 2009, Kelly has never looked back.
"Kelly is consistently ranked by Publishers Marketplace as one of the top five selling agents in the US. She champions creators of children's literature for nearly every category, format, and age group and she represents debut authors and illustrators, as well as bestsellers and award-winning clients." (Link)
About the Agency:
“The Andrea Brown Literary Agency was founded in August 1981 and has offices in the San Francisco Bay area, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago.
“Our agency works to bring to light the voices and perspectives of new writers as well as to nurture and develop the careers of experienced authors. Our goal, whether seeking to secure a publishing contract for a first book or a fiftieth book, is to make sure that clients are not only published, but published well.
“Our philosophy is to remain a ‘small’ agency at heart. We invest a great deal of personal care and attention in each project, and we are hands-on in all aspects of our interactions with clients. We work closely with clients in an editorial capacity and we devise a strategy at every stage of the writing process that will enable us to find the best publisher for each book. In doing so, we think about both short term and long term goals for our clients, always keeping the trajectory of a successful career in mind.
“Our agents have backgrounds in New York publishing, editing, academia, business, teaching, writing and film, and one of our strengths as an agency is that we work collaboratively. Our clients have the benefit not only of their individual agent's expertise but of the combined experience and vision of the group.
“As a West Coast based agency, we follow a tradition of West Coast innovation in our passion for discovering new voices, in our efforts to make New York publishing more inclusive of voices from other parts of the country, and in our attempt to see publishing trends that result from this broader perspective. We combine this approach with access, standing, and visibility in the publishing community at large. Our agents make regular trips to New York, attend industry conventions, and participate as faculty at writers' conferences all over the country. We ensure a high profile for our clients and actively keep our fingers on the pulse of publishing.” (Link)
What She's Looking For:
From Her Bio Page on the Agency Website:
Graphic novels, illustrations, novels in verse
 “Kelly is open to submissions in these categories:
1) graphic novels - YA, MG, and chapter book, including nonfiction and verse
2) illustration - those who are looking to write and illustrate and have a dummy to consider, as well as artists looking to illustrate other people's manuscripts
3) novels in verse
"Graphic novel creators Kelly represents include James Burks, whose graphic novel series Bird & Squirrel is in its 6th book (Graphix/Scholastic); Mike Lawrence, author-illustrator of the 3-book graphic novel series, Star Scouts (First Second/Macmillan) and an upcoming non-fiction graphic novel in the Maker Comics series called SURVIVE THE OUTDOORS (First Second/Macmillan); Sophie Escabasse, author of the upcoming graphic novel trilogy The Witches of Brooklyn (Graphic/PRH); Michelle Mee Nutter, illustrator of the upcoming graphic novel ALLERGIC written by Megan Wagner Lloyd (Graphix/Scholastic); and Jarad Greene, author-illustrator of his graphic novel debut, SCULLION (Oni Press).
"Kelly also represents a number of illustrators including Joy Ang, illustrator of the Wings of Fire novels (Scholastic), the NYT bestselling THE ATLAS OBSCURA EXPLORER'S GUIDE FOR THE WORLD'S MOST ADVENTUROUS KID (Workman), the Mustache Baby picture books (Clarion/HMH), and MULAN: THE LEGEND OF THE WOMAN WARRIOR (HarperCollins); Jessika von Innerebner who is the illustrator of the Miranda and Maude chapter book series (Abrams) and whose hilarious debut as an author-illustrator, IT'S NOT ALL UNICORNS, comes out this year (Dial/PRH in the U.S. and Scholastic in Canada); Kim Smith, NYT bestselling illustrator of the Builder Brothers picture books (HarperCollins), artist for the Quirk Pop Classic picture book adaptations that include HOME ALONE and BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER (Quirk), and whose debut as author-illustrator, BOXITECTS (Clarion/HMH in the U.S. and HarperCollins Publishers Ltd in Canada) is upcoming; and Kimberly Gee, illustrator of THE CLASS (Beach Lane/S&S), and creator of her own author-illustrated UP, UP, UP, DOWN (Putnam/PRH) as well as MAD, MAD BEAR! and its sequel GLAD, GLAD BEAR (both Beach Lane/S&S).
Some of the fiction writers Kelly represents include poet David Elliott, whose provocative YA novels in verse BULL and VOICES have received many starred reviews (Houghton/HMH); Christine Lynn Herman, author of the haunting YA, THE DEVOURING GRAY (Disney*Hyperion) and its upcoming sequel THE DECK OF OMENS; Sharon Cameron, YA author of several novels including the NYT bestselling THE FORGETTING and her upcoming THE LIGHT IN HIDDEN PLACES (Scholastic); Court Stevens whose courageous debut YA, FAKING NORMAL (HarperCollins) was a Golden Kite Honor and Kirkus Best Book and whose newest, THE JUNE BOYS, is upcoming in 2020 (Thomas Nelson); Jessica Young, author of the several chapter book series including Haggis and Tank Unleashed illustrated by client James Burks (Branches/Scholastic), as well as the upcoming Fairylight Friends series (Acorn/Scholastic); and Gina Bellisario, author of the superhero chapter book series, Ellie Ultra, with illustrations by client Jessika von Innerebner (Capstone).
"Picture book writers Kelly represents include Diane Adams, writer of the emotional TWO HANDS TO HOLD YOU and LOVE IS (both Chronicle); Alastair Heim, author of the funny books NO TOOTING AT TEA and THE GREAT PUPPY INVASION, illustrated by client Kim Smith (Clarion/HMH); and Jessica Young, author of imaginative books like MY BLUE IS HAPPY (Candlewick) and the companion books PLAY THIS BOOK and PET THIS BOOK (Bloomsbury).
"Kelly spent over ten years in her childhood in Singapore. Now she lives with her family in San Diego, and is on the Advisory Board for UCSD's certificate in Writing and Illustrating for Children. She is also a founder of the City Heights Young Writers Workshop and is a frequent speaker at conferences, including SCBWI's national and regional conferences. She can be found talking about children's books and being gluten free on Facebook (agentsonnack) and Twitter (@KSonnack)."(Link)
See her Manuscript Wish List. As of this date, it may not be current because it indicates other genres that she is interested in. You should also check her personal website which states that she is closed to submissions.
What She Isn't Looking For:
At this time, Kelly is not accepting submissions for adult fiction or adult non-fiction.
Editorial Agent?
Yes.  She reportedly does edits until a project is as good as can be before sending it out.
Web Presence:
Andrea Brown Agency website.
Publisher's Marketplace page.
Facebook.
Personal Website.
Twitter.
#mswl on Twitter.
Instagram.
AgentQuery, QueryTracker.
Clients:
Ms. Sonnack lists a number of her clients in her bio. There is also a select list of Andrea Brown Lit titles on the website.
Query Methods:
E-mail: No.
Snail-Mail: No.
Online-Form: Yes.
Submission Guidelines (always verify):
“We accept email queries only. Please direct your e-query to ONE agent at our agency, and include the following:
“Fiction: query letter and first 10 pages.”
Please see the Andrea Brown Literary website for complete, up-to-date submission guidelines as well as the agency's Submission AdviceDos and Dont’s, and Tips

Response Times:
The agency tries to respond within 4-8 weeks but does not guarantee a response due to the large number of submissions they receive. If you have not heard back in 8 weeks, assume rejection. (Link)
What's the Buzz?
Kelly Sonnack is a highly respected agent at a top-notch agency.  Her clients seem quite happy with her representation.
Worth Your Time:
Interviews:
SCBWI Exclusive with Kelly Sonnack Agent at SCBWI Insight (Date unknown).
Pre-Conference interview with Kelly Sonnack at SCBWI Midsouth (09/2010).
Audio Interview with Kelly Sonnack and Elizabeth Gilbert at Pen on Fire (02/2010).
Contact:
Please see the Andrea Brown Literary Agency website or Ms. Sonnack's website for contact and query information.
Profile Details:
Last updated: 6/1/2020
Agent Contacted For Review? Yes.
Reviewed By Agent? 6/2/2020
***
Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7(at)gmail(dot)com

Note: These agent profiles presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. They are not interviews. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found herein is subject to change.

Is it Really Ready?

In yesterday's comments, PJ Hoover mentioned that's it's hard to know when a manuscript is ready for querying.  "Is it ever ready?" she asked.  As I responded there, no, it's never going to be 100% ready.  You could revise and rewrite something your entire life.  Truly, you could.  But I think we often know in our gut if we're jumping the gun, if we're skimping on revisions or edits or passes we know we should do. 

I honestly believe there's a point you get to, when you've done everything you can with the help and resources you have available, where you can be reasonably confident it's ready.  You've revised, you've had the MS read and critiqued, you've revised again, you've line edited, you've set it aside for awhile and tweaked it yet again, and you can read through it and enjoy it without pause, without wanting to stop and adjust.  If you're not feeling pretty darn confident it's ready to go, it's probably not ready to go. 

I was pleasantly surprised when I opened up my Google Reader and found a new post by Darcy Patterson of Fiction Notes (previously Revision Notes) called "How Many Times Do You Revise?"  She shares some of the same sentiments and puts it better than I ever could - check it out!  Actually, check out the entire Fiction Notes site.  There is post after post of golden advice on revision.  I could post a linkfest of favorites.

I feel I have to add a disclaimer here, I've never queried - none of my projects have been ready (I can say that with certainty).  So I'd like to elicit the opinion of those who have experience on both sides, do you agree or disagree with my feelings on this?   How did you know (or not know) your manuscript was ready for querying?

Wednesday's Word Count

As weird of a week as I've had (a bit off schedule), I'm surprisingly okay with it being Wednesday today. I'm not okay with the fact that next Wednesday is the first of July. Oi.

Prior Goal: 10 revised pages a day and swap with Heather.

Accomplished: 59 pages - sort of.

Goal for new week: 10 revised pages a day.

Excuses / comments: I'm having some structural and plot problems, so I've had to brainstorm and then go back to rewrite sections I had already revised (hence the sort of). It's pretty exciting though - this second draft is quickly becoming a stranger to the first. I'm definitely not going to have my first pass of revisions done by the 30th like I wanted but I'm going to truck on and try to do as much as I can. Once I hit that date, a new goal will be set (if you haven't noticed, goals keep me sane).

Since I'm in the deep end of it, I'd love to hear about your processes for revision. How do you tackle it? How long do you generally devote to the whole shebang?

Preparing to Query

Samantha Clark, who chimed in on yesterday's conversation, wrote a fabulous post today called "Preparation is Key."  She reminds writers that we generally only have one shot with each agent (or agency as it may be) for each project (an intimidating notion if you have a short list of agents), and gives great advice on making sure your manuscript is ready and that you've done the proper research. 

Towards the bottom of the post, Samantha admits she previously sent out work that wasn't ready and was "roundly rejected."  This happens to A LOT of writers, and for many, that's the way they learn to write a better book, to take the process seriously, and to do the research they didn't do before.

I can't guarantee you'll get published by following "the rules" - this business is subjective and relies on writing a publishable book, after all - and I can't guarantee you won't have to write another book (or three) to develop the required skills to do so, but you might be able to save yourself some time, rejection, and grief by stepping up your game and removing any and all avoidable mistakes from your journey to publication.  Like querying before you're really ready.

Check out Samantha's blog, Day By Day Writer, and make sure to wish her the best on her newly well-prepared-for search for representation.

Reseaching Literary Agents

Elanja Johnson did a fabulous post on researching literary agents by utilizing QueryTracker on the QueryTracker blog today. There's also a bit about personalizing queries.

Something I'd like to reiterate is that you owe it to yourself (and it's a courtesy to the agents you're querying) to try to find a good match.

I realize that it's hard to find information on some agents. If you feel you must give these agents a shot, I'd recommend you know (at least) what genres they represent (yours?) and whether or not they have legitimate sales and/or a respectable seat in publishing. If you can't find even this information, why are they on your list? And if you're going to query an agent with this amount of information, do yourself a favor, have a prepared list of questions in case THE CALL does come.

I constantly see writers out there cold-firing queries, doing little-to-no research, and/or accepting the first offer they receive without question, and it just doesn't make sense to me. I can understand the desire to obtain representation and to get published but not the desire to get published no matter what. Personally, I want the best for myself, my books, and my expected career as an author. You should too. The goal is not to be a one-hit wonder, it's to build a career, and you're going to need strong, lasting relationships to make the most of it.

My closing advice: If you query all your great, good, and decent matches and still don't have representation, don't query everyone else under the publishing sun, write a new book or extensively rewrite.

Whether you agree or disagree, feel free to open up a friendly discussion in the comments.

And thank you, Elanja, for the great post!


A Morning Conversation

I'm sitting in front of my computer with the music turned down really low. I look over at Jesse. "Honey, I have a confession to make."

"Having an affair?"

"No. I've kind of become a fan of the Jonas Brothers. Well, I like a few of their songs..."

*Pause*

"I'm not sure that's better."

Happy Father's Day!

Jesse came home with a new set of pots and pans on Friday and said, "Happy Father's Day!'

Well, shoot. That was easy. Don't you love a man that loves to cooks and buys himself nice cookware? Add the gifts from the kids and me this morning, and I'd say he's having a good day so far.

But the family time is what really matters! I'm off to cook him breakfast and then we're going over to my dad's for a cook out.

Should be a lovely day. Hope yours is too!

Personalizing Queries

As you know, I'm all about promoting agent research and personalizing queries, but there are good ways of doing it and bad ways of doing it.  I've been meaning to do a post on this, but until then, check out this post.  Jennifer Jackson addresses mentioning a book from an agent's list in your query at her blog, Et in arcaedia, ego

Friday Teen Files

When you're in high school and you work at a pet store, you start wearing stuff like this around your neck.  Or, well, I did...

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Agent Spotlight: Daniel Lazar

This week's Agent Spotlight features Dan Lazar of Writers House.
gettyface About: “Daniel Lazar is a senior agent at Writers House, one of the industry's largest and oldest literary agencies. His list includes a variety of commercial and literary fiction for children and adults. For children's books, he represents primarily middle grade and YA.
Status: Open to submissions, actively seeking new clients.


What He's Looking For:
From Publisher’s Marketplace:
“I'm always on the lookout for distinct fiction and great, lively non-fiction. I represent adult and children's books (and for children's books, I focus mainly on middle grade and YA). For fiction, I love stories that introduce me to new worlds -- or even better, recreate the ones I may already know. I also especially love historical fiction of all kinds. For non-fiction, I enjoy memoirs, narrative non-fiction, all stripes and studies of pop-culture, and even small gifty books that strike my fancy and make me smile. I'm a huge fan of graphic novels and memoirs. And as the oldest child of six who has changed many, many diapers in his life, I'm equally intrigued by any book with unique views on parenting and family life.
A great way to judge anyone's taste in books is browse their bookshelf. Check out some of my clients' books: I've listed a sampling below. You can also find me on Instagram @DanLazarAgent, where I post about my authors or what I'm reading (and listening-- I love audiobooks) outside of work.
What He Isn't Looking For:
Mr. Lazar does not rep picture books, cookbooks, and romance and serious how-to titles. (Link)
About the Agency:
"Writers House was founded in 1973 with a vision for a new kind of literary agency, one that would combine a passion for managing a writer's career with an integrated understanding of how storytelling works. With this two-pronged philosophy, Writers House has played a critical role in developing the careers of hundreds of novelists and non-fiction authors. We believe in offering our clients not only our expertise in negotiating contracts, but in contributing to all phases of the editorial and publishing processes. Our goal is to maximize the value of our clients' work by providing hands-on editorial and marketing advice, as well as leading the way in branding, licensing, and selling film/TV, foreign, audio, dramatic and serial rights." (Link)
You can find many of the authors that Writers House represents on their website.
His Advice to Writers:
“Resist the temptation to finish your manuscript, raise a glass of champagne, and hit ‘Send.’ Force yourself to close the document. File it away in your computer or put it in the back of your closet under the old jeans, and don't look at it for 2 weeks minimum. As the World's Most Impatient Guy, I know how very hard this can be, but I find that some time away from a project always sheds new light on what more can be improved. Don't send that manuscript out until you're so sick of looking at it, you'd rather give away one of your children than bear the prospect of changing even a comma.” (Link)
Editorial Agent?
Yes.
Web Presence:
Writers House website.
Publisher's Marketplace page.
Instagram
Twitter.
AgentQuery, QueryTracker, AuthorAdvance.AAR.
Clients:
You can find some of the authors that Mr. Lazar represents on his Publisher Marketplace and AgentQuery pages.
Query Methods:

E-mail: Yes (preferred & faster response).
Snail-Mail: Yes.
Online-Form: No.
Submission Guidelines (always verify):
E-mail: Send a query letter and the first 5 pages of your manuscript in the body of the e-mail. No attachments.
Snail-mail: Send a query letter and the first 5 pages of your manuscript with a SASE.
Do not query more than one agent within Writers House at a time. For complete, up-to-date submission guidelines see the agency website and Mr. Lazar's Publisher's Marketplace page.
Query Tips:
“It's all about specifics. Too many queries default to broad strokes or to the "What if, what if, what if" series of questions. A good query doesn't have to cover every point of a book's plot. But it needs to give a sense of atmosphere and sensibility, and the best way to do that is with specific details.” (Link)
There’s also a great post of Query Dos and Don’ts by Mr. Lazar at The Guide To Literary Agents blog.
Response Times:
“We respond to every query -- you'll hear from me or my assistant. And our response time is 1 minute to several weeks.” (Link)
What's the Buzz?
Daniel Lazar is a highly respected, successful agent at one of the largest and most prominent literary agencies around. He has an amazing client list, impressive history of sales, and is popular among aspiring authors. You can follow him on Instagram to see what he and his clients are up to.
Worth Your Time:
Interviews:
7 Questions For: Literary Agent Dan Lazar at Middle Grade Ninja (07/2010).
Q&A With Daniel Lazar at Scripts & Scribes (08/2015)
Contact:
Please see the Writers House website and Mr. Lazar's Publisher's Marketplace page for contact and query information.
Profile Details:
Last updated: 4/23/2020
Agent Contacted For Review? Yes.
Reviewed By Agent?  5/2/2020
Comments: N/A
***
Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7(at)gmail(dot)com

Note: These agent profiles presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. They are not interviews. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found herein is subject to change.

Wednesday's Word Count

Wow. Wednesday really snuck up on me this week.

(Does anyone else have a hard time using the word "sneaked"?)

Prior Goal: 8-10 revised pages a day and swap with Heather.

Accomplished: 50ish.

Goal for new week: 10 revised pages a day.

Excuses / comments: Still doing good. I've reached 100 pages in my MS. Things are slowing down though. I've reached the quagmire of my novel so revisions are taking longer. I think I have to do approximately 10 pages a day to meet my (current) goal. There are only 14 days left this month!

How are you doing? What writing goals are you tackling this summer? Virtual cookies and confetti for everyone making progress despite the call of summer!

Procrastinating

Have you been to this site? Inkygirl.com Daily Diversions for Writers. Some of her comics are genius. Here is another favorite.

Bigger or Better

Some kids down the street are playing a game called "Bigger or Better" for a birthday party. The idea is that they go door-to-door trading up whatever they have for something, well, bigger... or better.

Naturally, when they showed up at the door with a Kungfu Panda toy, I gave them a book. Bigger and better, right? I think so.

So... right now the kids across the street are getting some Roald Dahl in exchange for a Raiders hat (yup, I'm spying), and very soon Goodwill will be receiving a toy panda.

Too cool.

: )

So Tell Me: Who Got Your Querginity?

If you don't mind saying, who was the first agent (or editor) you ever queried?  Why?

KT Literary Live Blogging Queries!

Kate Schafer Testerman of KT Literary has been live-blogging as she goes through her queries today (she does this every so often). I recall telling someone I'd post if she did it again, so... here you have it!

I enjoyed reading her notes. Some of them are insightful!

Friday Teen Files

007Jr. high was easily one of the worst periods of my life.  I didn't have an easy time of it.  At all.  But what's that saying?  Something good always comes out of something bad?  That's true in this case.  Jr. high was when my love of books began.  Mrs. Robbins, the librarian, took me in.  She made me her TA, gave me a sanctuary, and encouraged me to find solace in other worlds.  I lost my troubles in the fantasy section of that library.  

She was such a wonderful woman.  Frequently, she would excuse me from PE (which I was having trouble with due to a yet-undiscovered medical problem) on the basis that she needed more "help" for the extra hour.  Sometimes she excused me because I came to her crying.  I would shelve books or run around passing out overdue notices, other times, we would just sit and talk.  She meant more to me than she probably ever knew. 

004Anyway, as I was looking through my jr. high year books, she was the person that stood out to me the most.  Forget all those teachers I hardly remember.  Forget all my peers (except my still-bff, Tiffany).  Forget that poor kid I stalked for two years (sorry, Ace!).  My time with Mrs. Robbins in that school library now defines my middle school years. 

Things would improve infinitesimally for me in 9th grade, and I'd like to think her support and encouragement played into that.  Not to mention the role she's played in my love of books and writing.

Have you had a librarian touch your life?

Agent Spotlight: Marietta B. Zacker

This week's Agent Spotlight features Marietta Zacker of the Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency..
Status: Ms. Zacker is currently closed to submissions. Check the agency website to find out when she reopens to submissions.
Marietta 4-6-11 07 Lo Res Color About: "Marietta has worked with books, authors and illustrators throughout her career -- studying, creating, editing, marketing, teaching and selling. She supports independent bookselling, believes in libraries and takes pride in her work as a Latina in the world of publishing. She is always on the lookout for visual and narrative stories that reflect the world we live in, not the bubbles in which we put ourselves. She loves books that make readers feel and shies away from those that set out to teach the reader a lesson. Whether she is reading a young adult novel, a middle grade novel or a picture book, Marietta looks for a book in which young readers can identify with the actions and reactions of the characters, not the perspectives of the author or illustrator. Diversity in the story must be inherent and authentic, not trendy. She is thrilled to shine the spotlight on soulful, insightful, well-crafted, literary or commercial projects aimed at any age group from young adult to the youngest of readers." (Link)
About the Agency:
"The Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency focuses on developing and finding the right home for the work of some of the most talented writers and illustrators in the book industry. Established in 2000 by Nancy Gallt, and later joined by Marietta B. Zacker, we aim to bring to life stories and artwork that help young readers throughout the world become life-long book enthusiasts and to inspire and entertain readers of all ages. We represent authors and illustrators who share and, through their work, exemplify that vision.." (Link)
"Since 2000, the Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency has focused on representing authors and illustrators whose work we firmly believe will have the biggest impact on young readers. Our collective book experience totals almost 70 years and we use that expertise to represent both established and emerging talent." (Link)
Web Presence:
Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency website.
Twitter.
#mswl on Twitter.
Instagram.
QueryTracker.
What She's Looking For:
Genres / Specialties:
"Marietta is open to PB, MG, and YA fiction and nonfiction, all genres; graphic novels; illustrators. (Link)
From Her Manuscript Wish List:
"I am always on the lookout for visual and narrative stories that reflect the world we live in, not the bubbles in which we put ourselves. I love books that make readers feel any emotion and shy away from those that set out to teach the reader a lesson (although I believe that you will inevitably learn something from any story!). While I don't mind sadness, laughter will always prevail -- and if you can take a reader from tears to joy to whatever other emotion makes sense for the story, all the better. Whether a young adult novel, a middle grade novel or a picture book, I want readers to identify with the actions and reactions of the characters, which means that stories need to focus on the perspective of the child or young adult, rather than the author's or illustrator's, and diversity is inherent and authentic, not trendy. I want young adults and young readers to be able to lose themselves in the pages of the books, to feel something as they read, to see themselves and to feel validated with the turn of every page. Without a doubt, there are many writers and illustrators who have stories to share and yet who have never felt there was room for their stories to shine. I am thrilled to shine that spotlight."
From an Interview (02/2010):
"Work that moves me – whether through words, illustrations or both. I look for manuscripts and illustrations that speak to the rich, complex, diverse world we live in and hope to work with people that are just as passionate as I am about the vital function children’s books serve in our society." (Link)
What She Isn’t Looking For:
Ms. Zacker does not represent adult fiction or adult non-fiction.
Quotables:
"I want to see more depiction of what’s outside our world – true ethnicity, true representation of our populations. ALL kids need to be represented in books. More authentic ethnicity is needed." (Link)
"I always encourage clients to have a presence somewhere on the web, but to do what feels right for them. I think it's difficult to do it all well, so if branding yourself on the internet is new to you, I think it's best to take one social networking avenue at a time. I also feel it's important to remember that there are plenty of people who have mastered different aspects of the internet, so you should reach out to those who know more - again, especially when getting started. And although I feel it's extremely important to have a web presence, my decision to represent a client is not based on whether they do or do not have that presence." (Link)
Her advice to Writers:
"Write what you love, write what keeps you up at night, write what you know, write what you want to find out, but most importantly, write." (Link)
"Please sit at a library or bookstore, go to the genre which you are currently writing for, start with A and just read. When you are tired, leave, come back the next day or week and pick up where you left off. Keep doing that until you get to Z." (Link)
Editorial Agent?
"I love the process of writing and illustrating as much as I love connecting the dots. I love talking through issues that are not quite ironed out in manuscripts or projects, zeroing in on places where things need to be tweaked and helping writers and illustrators put their best foot forward. However, it is also true that I neither want to be a member of the person’s critique group nor take the place of an editor who will take the book in the direction that works best for them and their publishing house. These are fine lines to walk, to be sure and sometimes difficult to discern." (Link)
Peeves/Dislikes:
"When people hide behind the veil of professionalism when querying - never realizing that by stripping their personality and their writing ability from this first impression, they deny themselves the opportunity of being discovered.  I expect queries to be polished, yes, but also to give me an insight into the writer AND the writing; stock queries are 'for the birds." (via e-mail)
Clients:
There are lists of Nancy Gallt Literary clients on the website. 
Ms. Zacker's clients include: Ann Bonwill, Carin Bramsen, Dawn Lairimore, Laura Murray, Dean Robbins, Stephanie Sanders, Elizabeth Schoonmaker, and Hilary Wagner, among others.
Query Methods:
E-mail: Yes.
Snail-Mail: Yes.
Online-Form: No.
Submission Guidelines (always verify) Ms. Zacker is currently closed to submissions.
See the submissions page on the Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency website. Email a query with 2000 words of a completed manuscript or the full text of a picture book in the body of the email.
See the agency website for complete, up-to-date submission guidelines including other submission particulars.Response Times:
The agency tries to respond 4 weeks. If you do not hear back, feel free to send another email or query another agent.
Query Tips:
"...Please don’t pretend that we don’t know you. Indicate that you had once submitted before and now you are submitting again. I don’t know why some writers think they can pretend like we don’t know you or won’t remember you. We will. So, just mention it in your query." (Link)
What's the Buzz?
Ms. Zacker joined Nancy Gallt Literary and became an agent in early 2009, but she has over 15 years experience in the children's book industry. She and Nancy Gallt have since formed the Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency. She has a  growing list of clients and sales and has made a fabulous impression on the writing community with her passion and wit.  She has a unique view of the industry being both an agent and an indie bookstore curator.  Follow her on Twitter for updates and insight.
I had the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Zacker and found her to be very nice, communicative, and gracious. See the interview here.
Worth Your Time:
Interviews:
Interview with Literary Agent Marietta Zacker via Podcast at Minorities in Publishing (10/2018)
Interview with Literary Agent Marietta Zacker at justincolonbooks (07/2018).
7 Questions For: Literary Agent Marietta Zacker at Middle Grade Ninja (02/2011).
2011 Conference Series-Agent Faculty: Marietta Zacker at Chinook Update (03/2011).
An Agent's Thoughts on Series, an Interview with Marietta Zacker at Through the Toll Booth (05/2010).
Five Questions with Marietta Zacker at Kelly Polar's blog (03/2010).
Marketing to Indies, an Interview with Marietta Zacker at Market My Words (02/2010).
Interview with Marietta Zacker right here at Literary Rambles (06/2009).
Contact:
Please see the Gallt & Zacker Literary website for contact and query information.
Profile Details:
Last updated: 6/12/2020.
Agent Contacted For Review? Yes.
Last Reviewed By Agent? 8/29/11.
***
Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7(at)gmail(dot)com

Note: These agent profiles presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. They are not interviews. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found herein is subject to change.

Wednesday's Word Count

Happy Wednesday! Are you ready to report in?

Prior Goal: Swap 8-10 revised pages a day with Heather.

Accomplished: Four out of seven days and 40 pages.

Goal for new week: 8-10 revised pages a day.

Excuses / comments: I had company through the weekend so I took Friday, Sat, and Sun off, but otherwise, Heather and I are doing great (well, I think so). I have to re-revise a few scenes, but, not counting those, I've got about 40 decent pages under my belt for this round.

How are YOU doing? Is the start of summer affecting your writing? I feel like I really need to get out with my kids more, so it might start taking a toll on my goals.

Agent News: Evan Goldfried joins Jill Grinberg Lit

Here is the announcement that was in Publisher's Lunch:

Evan Goldfried
has joined Jill Grinberg Literary Management as an agent after five years at William Morris. He is representing genre fiction and graphic novels for all ages, as well as nonfiction including food, health, humor and pop culture.


The Jill Grinberg Lit Management web site still isn't up, but Mr. Goldfried's Query Tracker, Lit Match, and Agent Query profiles have been updated to reflect the change.

Special interests on AQ include:

Smart spy thrillers (Charles McCarry). Huge sff series, Dark Tower, Sword of Truth, etc. Upmarket genre fiction, something with a unique and fantastical twist a la REPLAY by Ken Grimwood (one of my favorites). YA for boys, like Percy Jackson or Artemis Fowl. Anything with series potential, because I love revisiting characters. Anything set in Asia (or abroad), particularly Japan. Jewish literature. Mythology. And graphic novels, which I've been reading since I was a kid.

Good luck!

Payback Required

Speaking of my teen years...

My family owns a book that details some of our family history on my mom's side.  For whatever reason, there was a week or so in high school I took it to school with me.  One of my guy friends was looking through it and discovered someone in my ancestry had married someone with his last name.  Musing ensued.  From then on, we called each other "cousin." 

Fast forward to last night.  I have family visiting from out of town.  We went out to dinner.  My "cousin" was there eating with his girlfriend.  I hadn't seen him in a few years. 

As he was leaving, he stopped by the table and said, "If they think it's your birthday, I'm sorry."

"Whaaaaa?"

Guess what happened.  Yeah.  Thanks cousin. 

Before we left I asked one of the waitresses, "Does Bryce work here?"

"Yup."

Bingo. 

Friday Teen Files

When I wasn't dashing off crazy bubble charts about myself, I was doodling in class. Extensively. 

015 copy

Why yes, that does say "Bubble Under Fire."  No, I wasn't on drugs.  Thanks for asking.

Agent Spotlight: Jennifer Rofe

This week's Agent Spotlight features Jennifer Rofe of Andrea Brown Literary Agency, Inc
Status: Open to submissions.
About: “Jennifer represents projects ranging from picture books to YA. Middle grade is her soft spot and she's open to all genres in this category – literary, commercial, magical, fantastical, historical, contemporary, and everything in between. As for YA, Jennifer is drawn to stories that shed a unique light on the adolescent experience; funny, wistful, or cringe-worthy romance; and fantasy and urban fantasy with exceptionally developed worlds. In picture books, she likes funny, character-driven projects; beautifully imagined and written stories; and milestone moments with a twist. Overall, she seeks rich characters, masterful writing, distinct voices and perspectives, and stories that transport the reader.
"Jennifer especially enjoys representing illustrators and author-illustrators, and is always seeking new illustrators with strong, artistic voices.
"Some of Jennifer's clients include New York Times bestseller Meg Medina, author of the Newbery Medal winner MERCI SUÁREZ CHANGES GEARS, the National Book Award Long List novel BURN BABY BURN, the Pura Belpré Award winning novel YAQUI DELGADO WANTS TO KICK YOUR ASS, and the Pura Belpré Honor picture book MANGO, ABUELA, AND ME (all Candlewick); Amber Ren, illustrator of the New York Times bestselling picture book BECAUSE by Mo Willems (Disney*Hyperion); New York Times bestseller Eliza Wheeler, author-illustrator of the HOME IN THE WOODS (Nancy Paulsen Books/PRH) and illustrator of WHEREVER YOU GO and WHEN YOU ARE BRAVE, both by Pat Zietlow Miller (both Little, Brown/Hachette); Sid Fleischman Humor Award winner Crystal Allen, author of the middle grade series The Magnificent Mya Tibbs and the middle grade novel HOW LAMAR'S BAD PRANK WON A BUBBA-SIZED TROPHY (all Balzer & Bray/HarperCollins); Denise Doyen, author of the E.B. White Read Aloud Honor picture book ONCE UPON A TWICE (Random House) and THE POMEGRANATE WITCH (Chronicle), illustrated by Eliza Wheeler; Christina Diaz Gonzalez, author of the action-packed middle grade Moving Target duology and the forthcoming graphic novel THE INVISIBLES (all Scholastic); Kim Tomsic, author of the magical middle grade novel THE 11:11 WISH and the follow-up THE 12TH CANDLE (both HarperCollins); and Dev Petty and Mike Boldt, the author and illustrator team behind the I DON’T WANT TO BE A FROG franchise (Doubleday/PRH).
"Jennifer is co-author of the picture book PIGGIES IN THE PUMPKIN PATCH (Charlesbridge). She has been on the faculty of many conferences including the Big Sur Writer's Workshop and numerous SCBWI conferences, and she is especially known for her The "So What?" Factor presentation. Jennifer earned a BA in English and a minor in Social and Ethnic Relations with a focus on multicultural literature from UC Davis and has a background in secondary education. ” (Link)
About the Agency:
“The Andrea Brown Literary Agency was founded in August 1981 and has offices in the San Francisco Bay area, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York, and Chicago.
“Our agency works to bring to light the voices and perspectives of new writers as well as to nurture and develop the careers of experienced authors. Our goal, whether seeking to secure a publishing contract for a first book or a fiftieth book, is to make sure that clients are not only published, but published well.
“Our philosophy is to remain a ‘small’ agency at heart. We invest a great deal of personal care and attention in each project, and we are hands-on in all aspects of our interactions with clients. We work closely with clients in an editorial capacity and we devise a strategy at every stage of the writing process that will enable us to find the best publisher for each book. In doing so, we think about both short term and long term goals for our clients, always keeping the trajectory of a successful career in mind.
“Our agents have backgrounds in New York publishing, editing, academia, business, teaching, writing and film, and one of our strengths as an agency is that we work collaboratively. Our clients have the benefit not only of their individual agent's expertise but of the combined experience and vision of the group.
“As a West Coast based agency, we follow a tradition of West Coast innovation in our passion for discovering new voices, in our efforts to make New York publishing more inclusive of voices from other parts of the country, and in our attempt to see publishing trends that result from this broader perspective. We combine this approach with access, standing, and visibility in the publishing community at large. Our agents make regular trips to New York, attend industry conventions, and participate as faculty at writers' conferences all over the country. We ensure a high profile for our clients and actively keep our fingers on the pulse of publishing.” (Link)
What She's Looking For:
Genres/Specialties:
Children’s books, picture book through young adult fiction
What She Isn't Looking For:
Poetry, screenplays, adult projects.
Quotables:
"I'm in regular contact with my clients, but it really depends on what phase a certain project is in and how the client prefers to work. For instance, I have clients who prefer receiving editorial comments via email and others who like to discuss them. For the most part, I typically communicate via email, but I call with good news and to discuss contract terms. I'm looking to build long-term, collaborative relationships with my clients."  (Link)
“I need to know if a prospective client is willing and able to revise – if not, then I won’t be able to work with the writer and I certainly won’t be able to connect her with an editor, who will expect revisions. I also consider how many projects/works in progress the writer has and if she is knowledgeable of the industry, belongs to a critique group of some sort, and is willing to spend time marketing her book once it’s published.” (Link)
Editorial Agent?
"I've never sent a manuscript to an editor without having worked on revisions with my clients. These revisions typically involve big picture issues, such as plot and subplot, character motivations, etc.  There are so many strong, compelling manuscripts on editors' desks that you don't want to give them any reason to reject yours." (Link
Web Presence:
Andrea Brown Agency website.
Publishers Marketplace.
Twitter.
#mswl on Twitter.
AgentQuery, QueryTracker, AuthorAdvance.
Clients:
A number of Ms. Rofe's clients are listed in her bio above. There is also a select list of Andrea Brown Lit titles on the website.
Query Methods:
E-mail: No.
Snail-Mail: No.
Online-Form: Yes.
Submission Guidelines (always verify):
“We accept email queries only. Please direct your e-query to ONE agent at our agency, and include the following:
“Fiction: query letter and first 10 pages.”
Please see the Andrea Brown Literary website for complete, up-to-date submission guidelines as well as the agency's Submission Advice, Dos and Dont’s, and Tips.
Response Times:
The agency tries to respond within 4-8 weeks but does not guarantee a response due to the large number of submissions they receive. If you have not heard back in 8 weeks, assume rejection. (Link)
What's the Buzz? 
Ms. Rofe is a highly respected agent at a top-notch agency.  Her clients aren't shy in praising her and many writers claim they'd love to have her as their agent.  Her particular interest in MG is refreshing.  She attends conferences regularly and is a popular speaker. 
Worth Your Time:
Interviews:
Ask an Agent with Jennifer Rofe at Literaticast (07/2019)
Interview with Jennifer Rofe at Lee Wind (10/2015)
Query Questions with Jennifer Rofe at Michelle Hauck (04/2015)
7 Questions for Agent Jennifer Rofe at Middle Grade Ninja (04/2011)
SCBWI Exclusive with Jennifer Rofe at SCBWI Insight (Date Unknown)
Contact:
Please see the Andrea Brown Literary Agency website for contact and query information.
Profile Details:
Last updated: 5/25/2020
Agent Contacted For Review? Yes.
Reviewed By Agent? Yes – 5/25/2020.
***
Have any experience with this agent? See something that needs updating? Please leave a comment or e-mail me at natalieiaguirre7(at)gmail(dot)com

Note: These agent profiles presently focus on agents who accept children's fiction. They are not interviews. Please take the time to verify anything you might use here before querying an agent. The information found herein is subject to change.

Wednesday's Word Count

It's time for the June-boggle. Are you boggling? It's June.

***

I'm too lazy to do a roundup I'm too eager to get to my revisions to do a roundup today.  But know I'm keeping an eye on you -----------------------------------------> THE EYE. White

My report this Wednesday (in June!):

Prior Goal: Finish big changes.

Accomplished: Mostly...actually, pretty much, yes.  I got THOSE big changes done but now there are OTHERS.

Goal for new week:  Operation revision smack down begins.

Excuses / comments:  June is THE MONTH.  I'm participating in the Summer Revision Smack Down (also on Facebook), which is hosted by fabulousness and made of awesomesauce.  But not only that, Heather (who is also these things) and I have devised a new plan of torture action.  We're swapping eight to ten pages every day of our revision/rewrites with the goal of accountability, insanity, and to be done with our respective revisions by June 30th.  June is going to be four weeks of muchness.  So says I.  Now, WROCK it.

Please leave your goals of wrock for the week in the comments and beware the eye.

Becoming Bookish


My daughter, Berlin, in sock monkey pajamas surrounded by her Baby Einstein books this morning. She's finally caught the book bug. She tells me all about the pictures and letters she sees and demands to be read to constantly.

*Heart*

Agent Spotlight Updates

Just a few updates/additions I've made to the appropriate AS pages.

Alyssa Eisner Henkin:

Worth Your Time: 2008 SCBWI conference notes regarding Ms. Henkin by Beth Revis at Writing it Out.

Nancy Gallt:

Please note: Ms. Gallt's husband and co-agent, Craig Virden, died suddenly of a pulmonary embolism on 05/06/09. You may want to give Ms. Gallt some proper bereavement time before sending her your query.

There's a nice article on PW called "Remembering Craig Virden" here.

Sara Crowe
:

Note: Ms. Crowe has updated her PM profile with the following. "From June 15th through September 21st I will be unable to respond to queries by email as I will be on maternity leave. Your emailed queries to sara AT harveyklinger DOT com will be read, but you will not receive a response unless we are interested. If you want a response, I would suggest holding off sending the query until after the 21st of September. PLEASE do not send queries to me by regular mail until after September 21st. I will not be able to respond to them."

ETA: I've also added new labels to the Spotlights including "Agents who rep MG," "Agents who rep PB," and "Agents who rep YA." Should be handy.

If you ever run across new interviews or information regarding the spotlighted agents, please send them my way. I would like to keep them relatively up-to-date but may not have time to keep up with it.

Much appreciated.