CURRENT GIVEAWAYS

Here are my current Giveaway Contests



Upcoming Agent Spotlight Interviews and Guest Posts w/ Debut Authors & Query Critique Giveaways

Katelyn Detweiler Agent Spotlight Interview & Query Critique Giveaway on 1/20/2020

Hilary Jacobson Query Critique & ALL THE STARS AND TEETH Giveaway on 2/5/2020

Megan Manzano Agent Spotlight Interview & Query Critique Giveaway on 2/24/2020

ADDIE THORLEY & KATELYN DETWEILER GUEST POST W/ QUERY CRITIQUE & AN AFFAIR OF POISONS GIVEAWAY & IWSG POST

Happy Wednesday Everyone! Today I'm excited to have debut author Addie Thorley here with her agent Katelyn Detweiler here to share about Addie's upcoming YA historical fantasy AN AFFAIR OF POISONS that will be released February 26, 2019. It's about a major murder scandal in Paris in the reign of King Louis XIV. It sounds fantastic!

But before I get to our post today, I have my IWSG post. And I'm excited to be a co-host for the first time.



Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

Posting: The first Wednesday is officially Insecure Writer's Support Group Day.

The co-hosts this month are:  Raimey Gallant,Natalie Aguirre, CV Grehan, and Michelle Wallace!

Optional Question: Besides writing what other creative outlets do you have?

I never saw myself as very creative until I started writing. It's one of the reasons that I enjoy it. It lets me express a party of myself that I didn't know existed. My only other creative endeavors are backstage work on community theater productions. There is some creativity to it, but it's also a lot of grunt work.

What about you? Do you have other creative endeavors? 

Now onto my post by Addie and Katelyn. Here's a blurb of AN AFFAIR OF POISONS from Goodreads:


After unwittingly helping her mother poison King Louis XIV, seventeen-year-old alchemist Mirabelle Monvoisin is forced to see her mother’s Shadow Society in a horrifying new light: they’re not heroes of the people, as they’ve always claimed to be, but murderers. Herself included. Mira tries to ease her guilt by brewing helpful curatives, but her hunger tonics and headache remedies cannot right past wrongs or save the dissenters her mother vows to purge.

Royal bastard Josse de Bourbon is more kitchen boy than fils de France. But when the Shadow Society assassinates the Sun King and half the royal court, he must become the prince he was never meant to be in order to save his injured sisters and the petulant Dauphin. Forced to hide in the derelict sewers beneath the city, any hope of reclaiming Paris seems impossible—until Josse’s path collides with Mirabelle’s, and he finds a surprising ally in his sworn enemy.

She's a deadly poisoner. He's a bastard prince. Together, they form a tenuous pact to unite the commoners and former nobility against the Shadow Society. But can a rebellion built on mistrust ever hope to succeed?


Here's Addie and Katelyn!

Addie’s questions for Katelyn –

1. Katelyn, you're a literary agent AND a YA author, which means you’re basically Superwoman (I don't know how you have enough hours in the day!) How do you balance both careers and how do you feel they compliment one another?

Ha! Superwoman. I wish! Honestly, I’m the kind of writer who goes days/weeks/months sometimes without actually writing—I don’t need to do it every day, and I usually can’t do it every day. I have swirls of writing where I’m really caught up in a project and it feels great, and then times where I value TV binges and human interaction and reading other people’s words way more. But hard deadlines always take priority, whether it’s a time sensitive read for a client, or a submission that requires all my energy and attention, or a revision due date for one of my own books. That’s when sleep might take a hit! But that doesn’t happen too often—I’m usually pretty decent at compartmentalizing and making sure my work days are agency focused, and my nights and weekends are for writing and reading (…or Neflix). Personally, I think the two jobs go hand in hand well and it’s hard at this point to imagine one without the other—being an agent and reading so many other words makes me a better, more aware writer, and being a writer makes me a more understanding and sympathetic part of the process for my clients. The insider publishing knowledge also came in handy when writing my latest book, out this July, The Undoing of Thistle Tate, about a bestselling teen “author.” (Quotation mark use very intentional. ;))

2. I love the fact that you're both an agent and an author because you really understand the struggles and anxieties that come with querying, being on sub, and the revision process. What's one thing you wish authors/querying writers knew about agents? If you can, give us a peek behind the veil into some agent insecurities or things we might not know that effect whether or not you decide to represent an author.

I definitely understand those struggles and anxieties! Honestly, I feel all the same emotions for
my author’s submissions as I do my own. It’s hard not to feel those rejections on a deep personal level—I love the projects I send out, and I know all the tears and sweat authors have poured into their work. We agents may act cool, but we’re feeling all the feelings right there with you. And that goes for the good stuff, too! All the big and little victories. We truly are in it together.

I also truly feel the pang of sadness whenever I reject a submission I’ve received. I know the kind of love and time and determination that went into those words. Please know—it’s never easy to press send on those kinds of emails.

3. Since you have experience on both sides of the author/agent relationship, what would you say are the most important factors in a successful partnership? What do you look for in a client, and as an author, what do you expect of your agent? 

COMMUNICATION. Definitely communication. Always. As an agent and as an author, I think transparency and honesty and openness are essential in a healthy, productive relationship. I really value an author’s opinions every step of the way, from what revisions to make, what the submission list will look like, what deal points matter most. I always want it to feel like a true partnership, like we are both sharing our insights and coming to the strongest possible strategy from there.

4. You represent authors of all genres and age categories, is there anything on your wish list that you're especially eager to find at the moment? 

Honestly, I never know what I’ll love until I’m reading it. It’s all about the quality of the writing and the voice itself—does it feel fresh, unique, inspiring? I’m a sucker for a good retelling, using an old story and giving it an inventive twist that makes it feel totally new. And I’m always looking to read about different cultures, different places, perspectives outside of my own lived experience. Overall, I’m all about balance, as an agent and as a reader—fantasy and contemporary, adult and children’s, a little of this, a little of that. It keeps things interesting!

Katelyn’s questions for Addie –

1. Was becoming an author always the dream for you, or were there other career paths you had in mind? Was there a moment where it really clicked—that feeling that writing was your path, that you just had to do it, no matter how long/hard the journey to publication might be?

When I was young, I was determined to become a racehorse jockey. (I was absolutely obsessed with the Thoroughbred series!) Unfortunately, I grew waaaaay too tall (I’m 5’ 9’’) so when that dream died, I decided to become a journalist/reporter instead. I worked in radio and television news before becoming a YA author, and while I’ve always loved writing, I did not love writing hard news. It was just so dry and depressing. When my husband suggested I try my hand at fiction, I laughed and insisted I could never write anything as long as a novel. Fast forward seven months, and I’d written my first rough draft (which clocked in at 112k, so I clearly didn’t struggle in the length department!) It was such a fun and freeing experience. I could have as many opinions as I wanted! It could have magic! And kissing! I knew then that this was the career for me, no matter how long it took. And it took a looooong time! An Affair of Poisons is the fifth novel I’ve written. The other four will never see the light of day!  

2. AN AFFAIR OF POISONS is one of the most wildly creative spins on a true historical event I’ve ever read. What was the inspiration behind the novel? What piece of the story came to you first? A character, a scene, the idea of alchemy, the time period?

This sounds totally creepy, but I have always loved poison. Something about smoky laboratories and bubbling cauldrons and dangerous, colorful bottles really calls to me, so I devoured every poisonous book and movie I could get my hands on. When I eventually began writing novels of my own, I knew I wanted to write a poison book. I just wasn’t sure who or what it would be about. One day, while doing research for a different project, I happened to read about the sorceress La Voisin and the scandalous event known as L'affaire des poisons (here’s a quick run-down: basically, members of the French nobility began hiring witches and poisoners to get rid of their bothersome husbands and rivals at court. It turned into a huge scandal that reached clear to the king’s inner circle.) I immediately felt that spark; I had found my poisoner at last.

I dove head first into research and was even more fascinated by the underground network of poisoners, magicians, and alchemists that La Voisin managed. I had a very clear picture in my head of a girl with crazy hair running around a laboratory, trying to make her mother, La Voisin, happy. The rest of the story spiraled out from there. One funny fact: in the first draft, Mirabelle made a love potion in the opening scene…which didn’t set the right tone AT ALL.  

3. I must admit, I know very little about this period of French history—and I’m all for learning some of the basic elements with a little alchemy and magic and, of course, swoony romance! Has history always been a passion of yours? What was the most interesting part of your research?

Yes! I’m a total history nerd. As a kid, I ran around dressed like an orphan straight from the gutters of Victorian London (complete with the British accent!) and I could often be found scaling the rock walls in our backyard, pretending to cross the Rocky Mountains with a wagon train. (According to my sister, I was a horrible embarrassment.) I was just certain I had been born during the wrong time period; the past felt so much more magical and compelling. As I grew older, I immersed myself in historical fiction, biographies, and documentaries, as well as some truly stellar TV shows (Shout out to White Queen and The Tudors!)

Research is one of my FAVORITE aspects of writing historical fiction, and I learned SO MUCH while working on An Affair of Poisons. I think I enjoyed studying alchemy/herbalism most, though. I read alchemy books, of course, but I also read about 17th century medicine, and wiccan spell work, and poisons, and the medicinal and spiritual properties of plants. I wish I could be an actual alchemist. 

4. As noted in the previous question: SWOONY ROMANCE. You wrote such a convincing, layered love story here, and somehow managed to do it without ever taking away from all the brilliant scheming and plotting and magical drama surrounding Mirabelle and Josse. Did you always know it would be a dual POV story? What was the hardest/easiest part of putting their love story on the page?

Ahhh I’m glad you think the romance is swoony! It only took me a million drafts to get it right. I knew from the get go that I wanted this to be a dual POV story, and I specifically crafted Josse and Mira’s characters so that they would challenge each other—both in good ways and bad. They are wildly different people, and certainly know how to push each other’s buttons, but they still have enough common ground to connect on a deep, emotional level. 

Getting that deep connection to come across on the page, however, was probably the hardest part of bringing their love story to life. I knew in my head why they were perfect for each other, but slowing the plot down enough to let them have those moments to really connect was something I had to work on during edits.

The easiest part was definitely their snappy banter. There were so many times while drafting and editing when I couldn’t help but laugh out loud.  

Thanks so much for all your advice, Addie & Katelyn! You can find them at:

Addie’s Links:
Twitter: @addiethorley

Katelyn’s Links:
Twitter: @katedetweiler

Addie has generously offered a pre-order of AN AFFAIR OF POISONS and Katelyn is offering a query critique for a giveaway. To enter, all you need to do is be a follower (just click the follow button if you’re not a follower) and leave a comment through February 23rd. If you do not want to be included in the critique giveaway, please let me know in the comments. If your e-mail is not on your Google Profile, you must leave it in the comments to enter either contest.

If you mention this contest on Twitter, Facebook, or your blog, mention this in the comments and I'll give you an extra entry. You must be 13 years old or older to enter. This giveaway is International to anywhere that the Book Depository ships for free.

Here's what's coming up:

Monday, February 11th I have an interview with debut author Astrid Scholte and a giveaway of her YA fantasy FOUR DEAD QUEENS

Tuesday, February 12th I'm participating in the Romance Is in the Air Giveaway Hop

Wednesday, February 13th I have an agent spotlight interview and query critique giveaway with Amy Stapp

Monday, February 18th I'm off for President's Day

Monday, February 25th I have a guest post by Mary Kole who has her own editorial service

Wednesday, March 6th I have an interview with debut author Gail Shepherd and a giveaway of her MG contemporary THE TRUE HISTORY OF LINDIE HAWKINS

Monday, March 11th I have a  guest post by debut author Victoria Lee and her agents Holly Root and Taylor Haggerty with an ARC giveaway of Victoria's YA fantasy THE FEVER KING and a query critique giveaway by Holly and Taylor

Monday, March 18th I have an interview with debut author Sabina Khan and a giveaway of her YA contemporary/multicultural the love & lies of rukhsana ali 

Hope to see you  tomorrow!


98 comments:

  1. Always good to read your post. Always much going on.
    Thanks.

    Yvonne.

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  2. Thanks for co-hosting this month, Natalie. And behind the theater scenes is uber creative work (not to mention the sweat-equity!). Enjoyed you guest's sneak peek, too!!

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  3. Thanks for co-hosting Natalie. Enjoyed the interviews, Katelyn and Addie. I echo the Superwoman thought!

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  4. I'm just going to say that Addie's book sounds amazing. I can't wait to read it!! Thanks for sharing this and for co-hosting!

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  5. Working backstage in community theater is totally creative and fun! I've done it before. It was nice getting to know Katelyn better. And I really love that cover.

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  6. A secret society of poisoners? That does sound intriguing! It took writing a historical novel for me to realize that history was incredible. I never really loved history as a student.

    tamara (dot) narayan (at) gmail (dot) com

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  7. Happy IWSG day! Writing is such a wonderful way to let our minds and personalities mingle and wander. I think our thinking processes in themselves are highly creative and evolved too. My children are teaching me this. Lovely interview! Very intrigued by both the author/agent and story :)

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  8. Thanks for co-hosting! My family used to be in plays a lot, so I love seeing the different types of theater scenery stage hands come up with.

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  9. Natalie, I loved working backstage for productions in high school and when I joined a local theater group. Good times remembered!

    Writing is a definite creative ability and hard work! Keep it up!

    Addie's book sounds amazing!
    Thank you for co-hosting this month.

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  10. So nice to hear a writer say they don't have to write everyday!! Book sounds great - love that you knew you'd write a poison book :)
    Natalie - working on stage productions can be a lot of fun - glad you're enjoying it

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  11. Thanks for co-hosting this month.
    I think it's so cool that you work in the theatre. Even technical stuff can be creative.
    Thanks for introducing us to Addie and Katelyn. It's nice to receive a bit of agent insight. Addie's story AN AFFAIR OF POISONS sounds dramatic and intense.

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  12. Thanks for co-hosting today!
    Writing opened up a whole new world for you, didn't it?

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  13. Natalie, yay! on yor first co-hosting, thanks so much. Your behind the scenes theatre work is absolutely in the creative field, even when it includes sweat! So long as you're enjoying it :)

    Thanks for the interview - interesting & helpful.

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  14. Working anything with the theater is creative. :) Thanks for co-hosting today.

    Nice to meet Addie and Katelyn!

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  15. Thanks for co-hosting today. What a fascinating premise for today's featured novel!

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  16. What a great post to kick off your IWSG hosting! Thanks for this one.

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  17. Thanks for co-hosting today. Addie's story sounds fascinating. I don't know much about that time period either. Maybe the story will fill in some gaps. Good luck.

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  18. I love books set during eras like that. And this sounds like my kind of read...I mean...come on...a young woman is a deadly poisoner. I love that!

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  19. Thank you for co-hosting, Natalie! I'm glad that writing has helped you tap into your creativity.

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  20. Thanks for co-hosting this month. There's so much cool stuff in this post. It's cool getting to hear from an agent and learning about this intense historical novel. Great post.

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  21. Hi Natalie, thanks for co-hosting this month. And backstage work on community theater productions is great. How have you been?

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    1. I'm doing well, Rachna. I'm getting a bit more excited about my writing. Hope you're doing good.

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  22. Thanks so much for the chance! I love the cover and the synopsis sound interesting!
    Sethmich6@aol.com

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  23. So happy you discovered writing. It's satisfying to work behind the stage, but expressing your inner desires is exciting. Thanks for co-hosting IWSG this month.
    Lynn La Vita blog: Writers Supporting Writers

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  24. I garden, bake and take photos – they're all kind of creative I think.

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  25. I think all creativity has a lot of grunt work involved.

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  26. Thanks for this interview! I can't wait to read an Affair of Poisons! It sounds incredible!

    catherine.zerega@gmail.com

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  27. Fun! I love interviews from agent and author perspectives, it's always so fascinating to hear from both. And thanks for co-hosting today!

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  28. Creativity is a funny thing. I'm with you--I never saw myself as creative but when people find out I'm a writer, they immediately assume I am. I still don't see myself that way.

    Good interview and the book sounds great!

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  29. I think stage work take creativity. Have to see the bigger design of how actions and set changes flow, the movement and communication between the actors, and knowing how to pull it off to make the masterpiece come together. :)

    Great interview. The book sounds really interesting!

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  30. I worked backstage theater in college, helping with costumes. Grunt work, yes, but the creative synergy of the cast and crew was amazing. Thanks for co-hosting today.

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  31. Wow! That book sounds really good! Best of luck!

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  32. The theatre work counts as creative I'm sure. I don't really have any apart from writing that I can think of. . . although a good few years ago I dabbled in photography so I guess that counts.
    Fascinating to read an interview by an author/agent. The book sounds great Addie.
    Thanks for being an awesome co-host for this month, Natalie.

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  33. Enjoyed the interview. Thanks for co-hosting. Happy IWSG!

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  34. I too have done my fair share of backstage grunt work in theatre. The creative stuff is maybe more glamorous and fulfilling, but honestly I enjoy the tech/stagecraft side more. Nothing beats the rush of a live performance! Or the boredom, sometimes that's fun, too. :-P

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  35. Creative writing is one creative endeavor that doesn't have boundaries. It could take you anywhere. Case in point - the book you promote in this post. Poison, history, and romance - it sounds fascinating.

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  36. Brilliant interview and intriguing sounding book. I am an appreciator rather than a creator. Well that is my excuse anyway.

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  37. How do you have time to be a host. Your blog is a huge creative endeavor all by itself.

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  38. I love the title!
    Natalie - Writing is a lot of grunt work!

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  39. Most everything I've done throughout my career has been mostly analytical. Chemistry research, solving problems, teaching others. So dreaming up stories is a welcome break.

    A couple of years ago, my wife and I helped with the backstage work at my son's middle school play that he was a part of. It was a lot of work, but it was fun. Glad you have that creative outlet.

    And thanks for co-hosting this month's IWSG post.

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  40. I do like to sing... All the other creative endeavors in my family are done by my wife (music, crafts) and kids (drama, music.)

    Thanks for this great review of what sounds like a completely compelling novel. I will definitely seek it out.

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  41. No need to enter me, just wanted to say have a lovely week and nice interview.

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  42. Thanks for the introduction to another great author. I look forward to checking this one out! @mirymom1 from
    Balancing Act

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  43. Interesting interview and so exciting to be an agent and author. Must keep you very busy. best wishes with your book.

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  44. Great interview and intriguing-sounding book. Thanks for co-hosting!

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  45. Hey Natalie, theater is very creative. Everything is pieced together until you have a story, just like in writing. I love it! Thanks for hosting.

    Addie and Katelyn, congratulations on the new release, I enjoyed your interview.

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  46. Theatre is so creative. I'm working on a novel now and the MC is a small community theatre owner. Thank you for cohosting!

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  47. Writing is so creative. I also think just being around anything to do with the theater is also creative, despite the grunt work.

    I like the research behind An Affair of Poisons. Gotta love research!

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  48. Fascinating interviews - both of them. Addie's book sounds like a winner, combining the right ingredients in one package of fun, information, romance, and excitement. And, I enjoyed reading Katelyn's answers as I'm currently querying agents about my travel memoir! Getting my query critiques would be so helpful! Thanks for hosting the pair and co-hosting the IWSG blog hop this month, Natalie! And, enjoy your own writing projects.

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  49. Nice to meet you Katelyn and Addie! An Affair of Poisons sounds great.

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  50. I love community theater. I'm not involved in it, but it's fun to attend. Thank you for co-hosting. Have another great month!

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  51. I've been a grunt behind the scenes on theatre productions. I like to think I had some of my own creative input. Ha! An Affair of Poisons. Fantastic title. Thank you for co-hosting!

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  52. Addie!! I'm so excited about this book!! Great interview ladies. I love that Addie wanted to be a racehorse jockey ;)

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  53. This comment is from Carolyn Clark:
    Great! Sign me up for a query critique AND a copy of AN AFFAIR OF POISONS. Thanks so much for all you do. I've also tweeted about both on @DrCC CarolynChambersClark@gmail.com

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  54. Great questions and answers from both ladies! I've been eagerly awaiting this book for some time--I, too, have always loved books about poison, poisonings, and the like (yes, a weird niche!). I'd love to be entered to win the preorder, but no need on the critique as I'm not a writer :-)

    Thanks! hmbryan (at) alumni.duke.edu

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  55. I'd love to be entered to win An Affair of Poisons. I'm so excited for this book :)
    GFC: Megan S.
    I tweeted: https://twitter.com/WordsThatStay1/status/1093515396517376000
    Email: megan(dot)clarsach(at)gmail(dot)com :)

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  56. Fabulous! I look forward to reading this. I've wanted to visit the Alnwick Poison Gardens ever since I read about them and they sprouted a society of gardener-assassins in my brain. LOL Here's my link: https://tinyurl.com/ydfaolvf

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  57. Fun and intriguing! Congratulations! Great interview! :) Looking forward to all the upcoming posts and excitement. angelecolline at yahoo dot come

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  58. Community Theatre sounds like a great outlet for fun, and creativity. Congratulations on the interview.

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  59. Addie's book sounds awesome! As a kid, I climbed trees and imagined I was Tarzan's sister or a resident of Neverland, or climbing the outside of a castle tower. I wonder if all writers embarrass their families when they are kids?
    And Natalie - theater is definitely a creative place, especially backstage! Thanks for co-hosting this month!

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  60. Addie's book sounds delightful. I've always been interested in poison and herbalism and medieval magic. Best of luck with this new novel!

    Thanks for co-hosting the IWSG this month :D

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  61. This book sounds amazing and suspenseful, so I'm excited to add it to my TBR. These posts are always fun to read and I always learn something new. Please do not include me in the critique giveaway. I shared on tumblr: http://yesreaderwriterpoetmusician.tumblr.com/post/182637075062/addie-thorley-katelyn-detweiler-guest-post-w

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  62. Great interview! Thanks for sharing.

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  63. Always loving poison isn't creepy, err umm, maybe just a little. haha

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  64. How can you go wrong with a description that starts, "After unwittingly helping her mother poison King Louis XIV"? Sounds like a page-turner.

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  65. I think you are very creative. Your interviews are so interesting. You have the best ideas of what to ask your guests and to share with us. And when you write you are creating your own stories, and I'm looking forward to reading then some day.

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  66. Thank you for co-hosting IWSG!

    www.ficklemillennial.blogspot.com

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  67. I always love these interviews. So helpful. I am interested in the critique giveaway but will pass on the book giveaway. I am just buried in books. Thanks for the post.

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  68. Best wishes for Addie and Katelyn. 2019 is a new year full of possibilities and smashing successes.

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  69. Great interview! Hoping all the best for Addie and Katelyn. Loved reading about Addie's process.

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  70. This is great! Thanks for sharing!

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  71. Great post! These interviews are always so interesting. I find the history of poisons fascinating, so I'm definitely going to have to check out this book!

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  72. Hi Natalie!
    I must say that the thought of "smoky laboratories, bubbling cauldrons and dangerous, colorful bottles" as well as "network of poisoners, magicians, and alchemists" gave me the shivers and piqued my curiosity.
    From one co-host to another - have a great February!

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  73. Hi, Natalie! Thanks for co-hosting the February IWSG question. And thanks for these great interviews. It must be amazing to be both an author AND an agent. Fascinating. And so is Addie's book. All the luck with this release.

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  75. It's always good to hear writers and agents talk about communication. It is key! Seems funny that we write/tell stories and yet sometimes have such a hard time communicating. Thanks for sharing the interview.
    douglas esper
    @douglasesper
    douglas@douglasesper.com

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  76. Sounds like a great partnership between these two. The book sounds like a lot of fun.

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  77. It's great to see that I'm not the only one who writes in binges. It's encouraging to know you can be successful without following the same path everyone else does.

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  78. Hi Natalie,

    Thanks for hosting the IWSG this month! Theatre definitely counts and creative! I have a long list of creative endeavors. I love it all .... I have one last creative endeavor... music. I always wanted to play piano. Someday I hope.

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  79. This sounds great! Thank you for the giveaway.

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  80. Wow...being an agent and an author would be tough! Not a lot of free time there.

    And Natalie, I think backstage work for a theater would be fascinating! I bet you meet so many interesting people that way, too...so great for developing characters. :)

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  81. An Affair of Poisons sounds like a great read!
    I would love to be entered to win the book.
    Thanks for the giveaway!
    natasha_donohoo_8 at hotmail dot com

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  82. So much going on and so many interviews. When I was young I had a lot of creative outlets, like arts and crafts, not so much now that I’m older. Good luck with your next set of interviews.
    Thanks for co-hosting this month!

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  83. Thank you so much for this opportunity :-):-):-) following through email lilyone90@gmail.com and I also mentioned this giveaway on Twitter :-) I would like to not be included in the critique giveaway.

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  84. Sounds like an amazing book! I've added it to my Goodreads TBR :-)

    Ronel visiting for Feb's IWSG Day Being an Insecure Writer -- And Happy About It

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  85. Thank you for the chance of winning.

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  86. Loved the interview, thank you for the mental image of a little girl wearing 19th century orphan clothes, with an accent, ha ha!

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  87. I'm a former TV news writer turned fiction writer too! Gives me hope :)
    Thanks for the great interviews.

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  88. Enjoyed the interview. Best wishes with your book.

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  90. I like these types of features, because they are a little glimpses into writers' processes and minds. Just what readers and writers like! I'd like to be entered in both contests

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  91. I'd love to win a pre-order of An Affair of Poisons. The setting sounds really interesting.
    https://twitter.com/arlandriaw/status/1099456929506549761

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